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51 Buried at Lynn-Hebron Cemetery, Hebron, Illinois. Ehle, John A. (I4911)
 
52 BURIED AT ROYAL PALM CEMETERY.
WROTE 1902 THICKSTUN PAPERS. 
Thickstun, Charles Wolfe (I1057)
 
53 BURIED BARNES CHAPEL CEM., HUNTINGTON CO., IN Foster, Etta M. (I3806)
 
54 BURIED BARNES CHAPEL CEM., HUNTINGTON CO., IN Foster, Francis (Frank) B. (I3813)
 
55 BURIED EATON, IN Shady, William R. (I3903)
 
56 BURIED ERIE, PA Reno, John Paul Rev. (I334)
 
57 BURIED GRANT CEM, HARDIN CO, OH Devore, Jacob (I3920)
 
58 BURIED IN CARMEL CHURCH CEMETARY Freeman, Arold (Erold) Sr. (I1065)
 
59 buried in Metuchen, NJ Thickstun, William Lewis (I1009)
 
60 BURIED IN OLD CEMETERY, METUCHEN, NJ Thickstun, Mary (I2628)
 
61 BURIED IOOF OR BARNES CHAPEL CEM., HUNTINGTON CO., IN Devore, Mary Ann (Mattie\Molly) (I3757)
 
62 Buried Lynn-Hebron Cemetery, Hebron, Illinois. Ehle, Henry G. (I4913)
 
63 Buried Lynn-Hebron Cemetery, Hebron, Illinois. Van Alstyne, Ann (I4925)
 
64 BURIED MOSSBURG CEM., LIBERTY TWP., WELLS CO., IN.
Retired farmer and member of the Boehmer United Methodist Church. Formerresident of Liberty Twp. in Wells Co., and had been a resident of Warrensince 1985. 
Schmidt, Frank (I3822)
 
65 BURIED MOSSBURG CEM., LIBERTY TWP., WELLS CO., IN. Member of BoehmerUnited Methodist Church and Rebekah Lodge of Bluffton, IN. Resided inWarren, IN for last year and a half, moving from Liberty Twp., Wells Co.,IN. Clark, Hazel Faye (I3821)
 
66 Buried same day as her husband. Van Alstyne, Catalyntje Martense (I4642)
 
67 BURIED SIX MILE CEM., WELLS CO., IN
Was a 1915 graduate of Bluffton High School. Attended Purdue Universityfor one year and then returned home to farm. All of the Devore familywere members of the Six Mile Church. 
Devore, Homer Ross (I3800)
 
68 BURIED SIX MILE CEM., WELLS CO., IN
Was a 1916 graduate of Bluffton High School. Was an elementary schoolteacher for 3 years prior to her marriage. They lived on a farmadjoining the old PSI IOTE pool. In 1923 they moved to a farm at thejunction of 116 and Harrison Road. 
Steiner, Mildred (I3799)
 
69 BURIED SIX MILE CEM., WELLS CO., IN Devore, G. Robert (I3796)
 
70 BURIED SIX MILE CEM., WELLS CO., IN Devore, Daughter-A (I3797)
 
71 BURIED SIX MILE CEM., WELLS CO., IN Devore, Son-B (I3798)
 
72 BURIED SIX MILE CEM., WELLS CO., IN Studabaker, Sarah (I3807)
 
73 BURIED UNION CEM., EATON, IN Shady, Robert L. (I3915)
 
74 BURIED WOODLAWN CEM., WARREN, IN Twombley, Caroline J. (I3630)
 
75 BURIED WOODLAWN CEM., WARREN, IN Schmidt, Daniel P. (I3823)
 
76 BURIED WOODLAWN CEM., WARREN, IN Devore, Lillie Idean (I3829)
 
77 BURIED WOODLAWN CEM., WARREN, IN. Died at Jefferson Sanitarium inHuntington, IN after an illness of 5 months. Van Dolson, Ernest (I3839)
 
78 BURIED WOODLAWN CEM., WARREN, IN. Died of stroke of apoplexy Sundayafternoon. Had attended church services as usual in morning and inafternoon attended a funeral. Had made plans with a neighbor forMonday. Upon her return home she fell as she opened the door. Herparents had arrived during her absence and cared for her till her deathon Wednesday. Martin, Merle (I3837)
 
79 BURIED YANKEETOWN CEM., ROCK CREEK TQP., HUNTINGTON CO., IN Shultz, Hannah (I3810)
 
80 BURIED YANKEETOWN CEM., ROCK CREEK TWP., HUNTINGTON CO., IN Devore, Son-A (I3802)
 
81 Calendar of Wills on file and recorded in the offices of the clerk of hte court of appeals,of the county clerk at albany,and of the secretary of state, 1626 - 1836

Published 1896, Knickerbocker Press, Compiled by Berthold Fernow

Records, Wills, I., p. 171
1984 March 3 1714 July 6 1717

van den BERGH, Cornelis Gysbertsen, of Rensselaerswyck Manor.

Wife Cornelia

Children Gysbert, Gerrit, Tryntie, wife of Peter Waldron, Marritie, wife of Cornelis van Alstyn, Cornelia, wife of Martin van Alstyn, Mathyas, Geertie, Wynant and Goose.

Real property in Albany City and N. Y. City, homefarm on E. side of Hudson R., 1 mile back into the woods.

Wife sole executrix. Witnesses Goose van Schalck, Anthony Coster and Volkert van Veghte. Albany Co.


 
Family F2921
 
82 CALLED HIMSELF IN LATER YEARS HERMAN VAN MEPPELEN (BORN IN MEPPEL). akaHerman Aalstyn, aka Herman Alston per Lester Van Alstine book, pg29.
SETTLED IN NEW YORK CITY. Lived in Albany, NY according to Lester VanAlstine book, pg27; in Amsterdam, NY per same book, pg29.
Came to America with his father in early 1650's. 
Van Alstyne (van Aelsteyn), Herman Janse (I2042)
 
83 CAME FROM CLEVELAND, YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND IN 1683 ABOARD THE "WELIOMEPROVIDENCE" WITH HIS WIFE, ISABEL, AND 3 CHILDREN, DANIEL, MARGARET &CHRISTIAN. Hoopes, Joshua (I2320)
 
84 CAME FROM ENGLAND ABOUT 1624 OR 1625. Howland, Henry (I2952)
 
85 CAME FROM ENGLAND ABOUT 1624 OR 1625. Howland, Arthur (I2953)
 
86 CAME OVER WITH THE HESSIAN SOLDIERS DURING THE REVOLUTION AND SURRENDEREDWITH BURGAYNE AND AFTERWARDS BECAME A NOTED DUTCH REFORMED MINISTER. Borke, Dominic (I5904)
 
87 CAME TO AMERICA 1630. Buell, William (I620)
 
88 CAME TO AMERICA ABOUT 1670. HIS FIRST WORDS UPON REACHING PERTH AMBOY, NJWERE, "I AM A FREE MAN", HENCE HIS NAME. Freeman, Joseph (I1114)
 
89 Came to America in 1910. Rabasco, Virginia (I6491)
 
90 Came to America in the ship Rensselaerswyck. In the passage was borntheir first child Hendric. Van Buren, Cornelis Maessen (I4643)
 
91 CAME TO AMERICA ON COMPANY VESSEL "LE MARICHAL D'ESTRESS", WHICH SAILEDAUGUST 19, 1719, AND AGAIN REGISTERED ON "LA LOIRE", CAPTAINDESPORTEHAINES, WHICH SAILED IN 1720. Renault, John (Or Jean) (I1247)
 
92 CAME TO AMERICA ON THE MAYFLOWER. MARRIED ELIZABETH TILLEY WHO ALSO CAMEON THE MAYFLOWER. John was the indentured manservant of Mr. John Carver,a wealthy Londoner, who became first governor of New Plimoth Colony inMassachusetts.
EMPLOYED BY GOV. JOHN CARVER AND LIVED WITH HIM. AFTER GOV. CARVER'SDEATH, JOHN BECAME HEAD OF THE HOUSEHOLD.
LAST OF THE PILGRIMS WHO DIED IN PLYMOUTH.

per St.Petersburg (FL) Times (11/24/1995):
'MAYFLOWER' DUE TO SET SAIL FOR AMERICA AGAIN IN 1999
A replica of the ship - to which 22 million Americans can claim a link -will be built in England.
Compiled from Times wires.
LONDON - Three hundred and seventy-five years after the Mayflower setsail from England for the New World, the English still proudly recall thevoyage of "the Pilgrim Fathers."
The Mayflower hopped and skipped along England's southern coastbefore the small, weathered ship finally jumped from its last port ofcall onto the high seas with 102 Pilgrims.
From the old London neighborhood of Redriffe to the ports ofSouthampton, Dartmouth and Plymouth, the Mayflower's route is marked byplaques, monuments, churches and pubs that proclaim the ship's departurepoints or lay claim to sites where its crew and passengers may haveimbibed, eaten or prayed.
Now, the ship is coming to America again.
Lawmakers and city fathers launched a campaign Thursday to raise$7.5-million to build a full-size replica, with plans to sail to Americain 1999.
"It's important to go back to your roots," said local lawmaker SimonHughes, who donned a broad-brimmed Puritan's hat and buckled shoes forthe occasion. "And we are very glad to be the roots."
The project is called Mayflower III - Mayflower II is anotherreplica berthed at Plymouth, Mass.
As legend has it, the Pilgrims' journey began in London in earlyAugust 1620. The ship was moored on the south bank of the Thames River,near the Shippe pub and the Church of St.Mary the Virgin, a shortdistance downstream from Shakespeare's Globe Theater and London Bridge.
Capt. Christopher Jones, skipper and part-owner of the wine carrierMayflower, popped into a local pub for a pint of ale with his hardenedlocal crew.
He received a sailor's blessing from the local vicar beforedeparting with a handful of religious Separatists, and other discontentedAnglicans, eager to meet their cohorts in Southampton before sailing forthe New World.
By mid-August, the Mayflower had linked up with the Speedwell, asmaller ship that carried about 35 more Separatists to the large port ofSouthampton from their self-imposed exile in Holland. The two ships,with a combined passenger list of 122, left Southampton on Aug. 15.
The rest of the England side of the trip was purely accidental.After almost a week at sea, the Speedwell began to leak badly and bothships turned back and docked in Dartmouth for repairs.
After 10 days at Dartmouth, in late August both ships left Englandagain. And again, this time about 300 miles west-southwest of England'ssouthwestern-most point at Land's End, the leaky Speedwell could go nofarther.
This time the Pilgrims returned to the fishing port of Plymouth onSept. 7. They remained there until Sept. 16, 1620, when they abandonedthe Speedwell as unseaworthy and crammed 102 passengers, a crew ofunknown size and what provisions they could carry into the Mayflower.About 20 people decided to stay home rather that risk the adventure onone crowded ship.
Sixty-six days later, on Nov. 21, 1620, the Mayflower, a crackedmain beam and all, landed at Provincetown, on the tip of Cape Cod. Theship finally settled in Plymouth on Dec. 26 and remained there throughthe winter before heading for home on April 5, 1621.
If the Mayflower had sailed directly from Southampton to the NewWorld as intended, or even from Dartmouth, rather than from Plymouth,England, Plymouth, Mass., would probably have a different name today.
Monuments to the Pilgrims and the Mayflower and its crew dot theriverfront in London's Rotherhithe - formerly Redriffe - and Southwarkneighborhoods. Many of the sites are impossible to authenticate becausefew records exist that predate 1700.
It can be documented, however, that Capt. Jones returned toRotherhithe from the New World on May 6, 1621. Less that a year later hedied there and was buried in the yard of St.Mary's Church on March 5,1622.
As for the Mayflower, it was a wreck by 1624. Its salvage value wasonly about $205 in today's currency. It was broken up in Rotherhithe,probably not far from where its voyage to America began, and its piecessold for scrap.
Workers experienced in traditional ship-building will beginconstructing the three-masted replica next summer on the south side ofthe Thames near Tower Bridge.
The 90-foot ship will be built entirely of wood, mostly oak andfir. The project will involve some guesswork.
"We have no plans of the vessel, but ships' logs and sailors'manuals give us a very good idea of the design and the riggings," saidnaval architect Colin Mudie.
He said ship-builders had estimated the ships' dimensions based onits tonnage - 25 feet wide, and 33 feet from the keel to the top of thepoop deck.
Construction is expected to take two years. After a launch in early1998, the plan is to make the 65-day crossing the following spring to NewYork, Plymouth and other Pilgrim sites. It would sail back formillennium celebrations.
Organizers have raised only $23,000 so far and are approachingBritish companies and individuals for sponsorship.
Virginia Alden, whose husband is descended from the Mayflower'scooper, John Alden, said there are some 22-million people in the UnitedStates and 370,000 in Britain who can trace their families to the ship'spassengers.
"If all those people gave a dollar," said Mayflower III organizerHeather Pickering, "we could build a whole fleet of Mayflowers." 
Howland, John (I751)
 
93 CAME TO AMERICA WITH MOTHER IN JUNE 1658 IN SHIP "BROWN FISH". FATHERHAD COME OVER TWO YEARS EARLIER. Andriessen, Rachel (I4547)
 
94 Came to Springfield, Otsego Co., NY from Polchester, CN in 1786. Rathbun, Benjamin (I716)
 
95 Captain John D. Van Alstyne, son of Abraham Van Alstine, andgreat-grandson of Major Peter Van Alstyne, the pioneer, was born inPrince Edward County in 1842. His father was a shoe-maker by trade,before the advent of shoe factories and ready-made shoes, and carried onan extensive business. In 1845 he removed with his family to New Haven,New York. He was induced to make this change by John Williams, hisbrother-in-law, who had already settled there. After living eight yearsat New Haven, and doing a successful business, Abraham Van Alstynereturned to Prince Edward County, and lived there until his death. He waswell known and very much respected in the community, where he had seenthe county transformed from a wilderness into fruitful fields andprosperous communities. Cornelis Van Alstyne, Abraham's father, was oneof the early magistrates in Athol, Prince Edward County, and Captain JohnD. Van Alstyne well remembers hearing his grandfather relate anecdotes ofpeople driving with ox teams for miles to his grandfather's house to bemarried. At this time local preachers had no authority to perform theceremony, and magistrates were important personages in the community;they settled the differences in the communities where they lived and wereheld in high respect. Captain John D. Van Alstyne recalls his frequentvisits, when a boy to see his great-grandmother Ferguson, who lived to beone hundred and one years old. On these visits she would relatereminiscences of the Revolutionary War, having lived near New York duringthat perilous period.
Captain John D. Van Alstyne, from boyhood, yearned to follow our inlandseas, and the long desired opportunity came when he was seventeen yearsof age, and secured the position of cook on a sailing vessel at sixdollars per month. Young Van Alstyne did not know much about cooking, butthe menu was a plain one and he had full confidence in his ability tosucceed. He was soon sailing master of the "Gold Hunter". In 1866, hesailed on the steamer, "Maize" of Toledo, and later was captain of the"British Queen". He was three years first mate of the schooners "NewDominion" and "Union Jack", and held the position of captain on theschooners "Ontario" and "Huron" and upon the steamers "Saxon" and"Clinton". He built the steamer "Iona" of Trenton, which he ran for eightyears. He was also captain of the steamer "W.J.Carter" which sailed fromBuffalo to Georgian Bay and Lake Huron ports.
As will be seen from this sketch, Captain Van Alstyne has followed thelakes for forty-five years and is familiar with the ports from Gaspe toDuluth and Chicago. Captain Van Alstyne has lived in Trenton for manyyears and is a sterling citizen in all that the word implies. In politicshe is a liberal. 
Van Alstyne, John D. Capt. (I5413)
 
96 Captain, then a major in the Army of the Revolution. Esselstyn, Richard Major (I6831)
 
97 Carolyn's twin. Married her own uncle. Devore, Adeline (I3818)
 
98 Catharina contracted Diabetes in 1901, and by 1910 she was confined tobed. She died in 1913 after a two year illness according to her obituary. Wohlgehagen, Catharina (I16)
 
99 Cemetary moved on account of Huntington Reservoir being put there. Mcnutt, Rachel (I3758)
 
100 CHARLES WAS MARRIED THREE TIMES. HE WAS DIVORCED FROM HIS FIRST WIFE,GERTRUDE COLLINS WELLS. HE HAD THREE CHILDREN WITH GERTRUDE, THEDAUGHTER, ARLEEN, DIED OF DIPTHERIA AT AGE SEVEN. CHARLES MARRIED IRENELAVALLEY THE SECOND TIME. IRENE HAD A SON PREVIOUS TO THE MARRIAGE, DALE,WHO CHARLES GAVE HIS NAME WELLS TO, AND RAISED HIM AS HIS OWN. IRENE DIEDIN 1944. CHARLES LEFT ALL OF THE CHILDREN WITH HIS BROTHER SOLEN AND HISWIFE ETHEL WHO RAISED THEM WITH THEIR OWN CHILDREN AT 20 MUNSON ST.,POTSDAM, NY. CHARLES REMARRIED FOR A THIRD TIME ETHEL CASSELL WELLS. THEYDID NOT HAVE ANY CHILDREN. IN 1949 CHARLES WENT TO VISIT HIS FAMILY INPOTSDAM, NY. ON THE WAY HOME TO SYRACUSE, NY, SOMEWHERE NEAR ADAMS, NY,CHARLES HAD A HEART ATTACK AND DIED. SOLON AND ETHEL WERE WITH HIM.CHARLES FUNERAL MASS WAS AT ST.MARY'S CHURCH IN POTSDAM, NY. HE WASBURIED BESIDE IRENE IN ST.PATRICK'S CEMETARY IN BRASHER FALLS, NY. Wells, Charles J. (Duwell) (I4702)
 

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