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251 SETTLED IN KINDERHOOK, THEN LINLITHGO, NY Van Alstyne (van Aelsteyn), Dorothy (I2049)
 
252 she immigrated in 1867. Could not read/write English, but could speak it. Dugan, Catherine (I48)
 
253 SISTER OF CHRIS Magee, Bessie (I2300)
 
254 SOLDIER IN WAR OF 1812 Allen, Jacob (I2782)
 
255 Soldier in War of 1812, afterwards a lieutenant and then a captain in theFourth Regiment of Artillary in the New York State Militia. Hiscommission as lieutenant, signed by Gov. Daniel D. Thompkins, and ascaptain by Gov. DeWitt Clinton, are now in possession of his nephew,Lawrence Van Alstyne of Sharon, CT. Van Alstyne, William (I7125)
 
256 Some say Lewis was adopted by Jacob and Catherine McCartney Devore.Jerry Pugh still looking for proof. Buried in Warren Woodlawn Cemetary.
Member 130th Indiana Infantry. 
Devore, Lewis Edward (I3974)
 
257 SOURCE: BAPTISM. Parish records searched by Duncan Harrington, England. IGI Family History Library. Came on the ship "MONTREAL" 28 Mar 1837. CENSUS: 1870 Schenectady Schenectady Co NY 5th ward:29:229-251: Long, Daniel ae 40 b NY moulder, Jane ae 35 keeping house b NY [WRONG B ENGLAND] 1880 Schenectady 5th ward:38:82-337-428: Long, Daniel ae 49 b NY parents b Wurtenburg, Jane E 43 wife b England also parents. 1900 see husband. 1920 See Robert Kerste family. OBIT: Schenectady Gazette Tues a.m. Nov 22 1932: LONG. Saturday November 19, 1932 Jane Eliza Long of 314 Paige Street, this city. Services, to which friends are invited will be held Tuesday Nov. 22, at 2 p.m. from the chapel of Gordon A Jewell, 345 State Street. Friends may call Monday evening after 7 o'clock. Interment in family plot Vale Cemetery. Mon morning Nov 21 1932: Mrs Daniel Long. Services for Mrs Jane Long 97, wife of the late Daniel Long who died Saturday morning at her home 514 Paige Street after an illness of three years, will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock in Jewell's Parlors, State Street conducted by Rev Hale F Thornberry of the First Baptist Church. Burial will be in Vale Cemetery in the family plot. The funeral parlor will be open tonight. Mrs Long was born in England and when she came to this country , came directly to this city and had lived here since she was three years old. She was one of the oldest members of the First Baptist Church, Union Street. Her husband died in 1910. Only nieces and nephews are surviving. DEATH: NY VR. PROBATE: LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JANE ELIZA LONG OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SCHENECTADY STATE OF NEW YORK. I JANE ELIZA LONG, being of sound mind and memory do herby make, publish and declare this my Last will and Testament, in manner and form following: First: I direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon after my decease as conveniently can be done. Second: I hereby order and direct my executor hereinafter named, and his successor, to sell and dispose of the real property known as number 512 Paige Street, being a two family frame house and lot, at public or private sale,as may seem best in his judgement, as soon as convenient after my death, and that out of the proceeds of such sale my said executor pay to the following named persons the following legacies which I give and bequeath to them; To my nieces, Stella Bromley, Elizabeth Hayden, and Emma Mowers, each the sum of One hundred Dollrs ($100.00); To my nephew William Rouse, the sum of One hundred Dollars ($100.00); To my niece Pearl Bink, the sum of One hundred Dollars ($100.00); To Gail A Kerste and Robert H Kerste, grandchildren of my niece Harriet I Oatting, each the sum of One hundred Dollars ($100.00), to be used by their father or mother toward their education; To my niece Harriet I Oatting, one-half (1/2) of all the rest, residue and remainder of the proceeds of said sale; and to the First Baptist Church of the city of Schenectady, New York, the other one-half (1/2) of the rest, residue and remainder of the proceeds of said sale. Third: I give and bequeath to Walter H Oatting, my executor hereinafter named, my Field Glasses. Fourth: I give and bequeath to my niece Harriet I Oatting, all of my personal property, of every name and kind whatsoever, forever. Fifth: In case I shall hereafter acquire or become seized and possessed of additional real property then I give, devise and bequeath one-half (1/2) of all such property of which I shall hereafter become seized and possessed or shall hereafter acquire, to my niece, Harriet I Oatting, and the remaining one-half (1/2) thereof to the First Baptist Church of the city of Schenectady, New York. Sixth: I nominate, constitute and appoint Walter H Oatting sole executor of this my Last Will and Testament, to serve without bonds; hereby revoking all former Wills and Codicils by me at any time heretofore made. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this Fifteenth day of September, 1924, in the year One thousand Nine hundred and Twenty-four. Jane E Long (L S) Witness: W W Wemple W W Wemple Jr CEMETERY: Section L GS: JANE ROUSE HIS WIFE 1836 - 1938 LONG. Rouse, Jane Eliza (I9723)
 
258 SPENT DECLINING YEARS OF HER LIFE SINCE JAN 10, 1891 IN THE UTICA STATEHOSPITAL, UTICA, NY. OWNED HOUSE AT 241 LEON STREET, SYRACUSE, NY PLUSOTHER REAL ESTATE IN SYRACUSE & YONKERS, NY AND EAST ST.LOUIS, IL. Stjohn, Harriet L. (I2061)
 
259 SPENT MOST OF HIS LIFE IN THE VAN BUREN AND WARREN AREA. WAS RETIREDFROM THE JOHN DEERE DEALERSHIP IN WARREN. HE WAS A VETERAN OF WWII ANDWAS A MEMBER OF VAN BUREN AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 368. ATTENDED VANBUREN NAZARENE CHURCH. Lewis, Elza Grayston (I3657)
 
260 SSN: 392-14-5977 Frischmann, Lawrence Karl (I11901)
 
261 Taken prisoner at the beginning of the Revolutionary War the followingway:
He and his family were in the Fort to avoid the Indians and Tories, whowere overrunning the Mohawk Valley, killing and butchering the settlers.At that time he had a wife and three daughters.
Two of his daughters, aged 11 and 13, with the father (Catherine was 7)went from the fort to their home, or farm to see what devastation theIndians had committed while they had been in the fort for protection. Itwas rumored that the Indians had left the vicinity and it was safe to gooutside the fort.
While they were at the farm the Indians came and surprised them andtook the father and the two girls prisoners and started for Canada withthem. As night came on, the Indians told the girls they might go back tothe fort, but if they told where their father was, or what had become ofhim, the Indians would kill him.
The girls started for the fort, but before they were out of sight, theywere called back by the Indians and they repeated their warning. Thelittle girls stated they expected they would surely be killed when theywere called back, as the Indians had threatened to kill the father andthem before they let them go.
They had their little dog with them when they went to look at the farm.This dog the Indians killed, cooked and ate, offering the girls andfather some of the meat, but they refused.
The father, however, after his return, stated that before he got toCanada, he was so hungry he would have been glad to have eaten anything,even dog meat. He was kept a prisoner for seven years.
The family mourned him as dead, until his retrun, after the close ofthe Revolution. They heard nothing of, or from their father after he wastaken prisoner, and when he returned after the close of the Revolution,there was great rejoicing in the family. When he was taken prisoner,there were three daughters in the family, and after he returned, the nextyear there was a son born, named Henry. Mother did not remember the givenname of her great grandfather Herring, nor the given name of her greatgrandfather Chawgo, who was killed at Oriskany. He was married and hadchildren. One son, Jacob Chawgo, mother's grandfather, was a very smallboy when his father was killed, his grandfather treated him very cruellyas he lived with him. The Chawgo's were French Hugenots. They emigratedto America about 1620, and later settled, probably near whereSt.Johnsville now stands in the Mohawk Valley or at Stone Arabia.
Great grandmother, Catherine, told Mother that after the Revolutionwhen they went back home they found 13 dead horses in the house, old oryoung. The door had apparently been left open by the Indians, and thehorses went in the house for shelter and in some way pushed the door shutand starved to death.
This information from the files of Nelson H. Tunnicliff was kindlyloaned me with the other papers concerning the Chawgo-Rathbun families,November 1, 1927. A. L. Van Alstine - (from Lester Van Alstine's book,pgs 262-263) 
Heering, Hendrick (I875)
 
262 Taught school for a number of years. She bought a farm, built a houseand then married. Farmed it a few years, then sold her farm, bought ahouse and lot in Webster, NY and lived a retired life, Van Alstyne, Sarah Catherine (I6631)
 
263 THE HYDE NAME IS AN ANCIENT AND HONORABLE NAME IN THE ANNALS OF ENGLAND.BY THE MARRIAGE OF ANNE HYDE, DAUGHTER OF THE EARL OF CLARENDON WITH THEDUKE OF YORK, AFTERWARDSD JAMES II, THE STOCK WAS INGRAFTED INTO THEROYAL FAMILY. WILLIAM WAS OF MUCH HUMBLER ORIGIN, BUT A MAN OFDISCRETION AND INTEGRITY.
THE HIDES OR HYDES OF SAYBROOK APPEAR TO HAVE BEEN OLDER EMIGRANTS THANTHOSE OF THAT NAME IN MASSACHUSSETTS. THEY MAY HAVE COME DIRECT FROM THEOLD COUNTRY IN COMPANY WITH FENWICK.
WILLIAM CAME FROM ENGLAND WITH REV. THOMAS HOOKER TO NEWTON, MASS. IN1633. HE REMOVED TO HARTFORD, CT. IN 1636 AND WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OFHARTFORD, CT.
HE WAS AN ORIGINAL PROPRIETOR OF NORWICH, CT. 1660. HE WAS IMPORTANT ANDWEALTHY. 
Hyde, William (I655)
 
264 Theodore Roosevelt Genealogy
http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/images/research/rooseveltgenealogy1649thru1902 
Roosevelt, Shenzada (I7676)
 
265 They were Bavarians:

http://www.glonn.de/gemeinden/baiern_geschichte.htm

Here is the above page auto-translated from German by babelfish.altavista.com:



Coat of Arms:
The coat of arms description approved by the central management of national archives 1970 reads: ' over three-mountain, in front one above the other two red roses, split by blue and silver, in the back a golden Birkenzweig with two sheets.' The three-mountain symbolizes the hilly situation of the municipality in the after-ice-age morainic landscape; the heraldischen roses originate from the coat of arms of the monastery Weihenstephan, which was up to the secularization of largest basic owners in the municipality; the Birkenzweig refers the oldest place of the municipality, which was called Birkenanger original to mountain meadows.

History:
The municipality name Baiern is derived from the frequently used old-high-German word bur in the meaning house. The amassment of the place name Beuern, Beuren or Baiern arranged primarily church places in the Middle Ages for better distinction to place the church patron in front. The weiler Jakobsbaiern was thus name giver for the entire municipality.


From first humans tool find in the moorland of the Glonntals witnesses. A stone hatchet is to be assigned the Jungsteinzeit, a ledge hatchet to the bronzezeit. The martial Celts left only the names for the river Glonn, which some with ', Celt researchers translated the clear one ' however with ' valley '. 776/778 are already given a newly built church in ' Perhhangaú (mountain meadow, originally Birkenanger) to bishop Aribo von Freising. Probably because the Kirchlein became too small, the Bergangerer 1489 established a gothical Tuffquaderbau with netzgewoelbe. 1895 held the neo-gothic style introduction and changed also the turmspitze. 846 for the first time the place ' Puurronú appears in the Freisinger traditions. And because there were so many places of the same name, 926/37 from it for more exact determining position ' Hangentinpurunú (Baiern at the slope) became. 1294 are for the first time reported by a church, those at the beginning 20. Century ramshackle and 1908 were broken off. Only that only 1878 builds tower again stopped and might thereby a Bavarian rare piece be.

Place for a larger church offered the close convenient Antholing. Which the 500-Seelen Pfarrgemeinde starting from 1908 created there is to be particularly emphasized: A far away visible place of worship, which connoisseurs praise both from architecture as well as from the interior equipment as most successful new baroque church of the ore diocese.

Hidden in the forests strange barriers tell of uncertain times. Three fleeing castles on mountain spurring with neck ditches and palisadengekroenten barriers protected humans, cattle and grain in the Middle Ages (hopefully) against the hive-greedy rider hordes/hurdles from the east. After the secularization many farmers could acquire their yards from former church possession. Four farmers bought in addition still their church. Thus a baroque Kleinod in far churches of future generations remained. In mountain meadows an unusual clock with rammer the front of the Mittermaierhofes ziert. It was donated to 1591 by the dukes William V. and Maximilian I. present at a wallfahrt to the thanks for hospitality.

The Sweden chapel and the Marienheiligtum Frauenbruendl are Relikte of the dreissigjaehrigen war and from the Bergangerern to the thanks were established, because they remained spared from the plague from the war and.

In a document the yearly 1810 the 33 deserts, weiler and villages to the assessment area ' Bavaria in Altbaiern ' ( way of writing today turned around exactly) together are seized for the first time. The regional reorganization gave a place in the central administrative body Glonn to the municipality Baiern. The Bairer could retain thereby to the largest part their selbststaendigkeit.

Some farms of the municipality are already mentioned in the herzoglichen tax book of 1417. 600 years the municipality had hardly changed. The post-war period brought a change in the agriculture and with it a change of the harmoniously structured Voralpenlandschaft. However the classification of construction sites in Antholing and mountain meadows had more substantial effects - also on the social structure of the municipality Baiern -. Here scarcely 100 single family houses coined/shaped by the alpine style developed according to the native model.

 
Family F4081
 
266 Took up the study of law at age fourteen. He started practicing law in1803 at Kinderhook, N.Y. In 1809 he moved to Hudson, NY where he gainedstrength and wisdom to practice at the bar. In 1815 to 1819 he wasAttorney General of the state. Martin Van Buren was elected Governor ofthe state. He was eighth President of the United States 1837 to 1841. Hemarried Hannah Hoes. He retired in 1848 and spent the rest of his life onhis estate at Kinderhook, NY, where he died on July 24, 1862. Van Buren, Martin Pres. (I6461)
 
267 TWIN TO HANNA Reno, Susan (I1485)
 
268 twin to susan Reno, Hanna (I1484)
 
269 TWINBROOK MEDICAL CENTER, 3805 FIELD ST., LAWRENCE PARK, ERIE, PA16511-1999. Bowen, Lola (I267)
 
270 UNITED WITH THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF METUCHEN, NJ IN THE SPRING OF1862, AND WAS A MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR 10 YEARS. HE HAD ALARGE WELL-CULTIVATED FARM AND A PLEASANT HOME. HE WAS A LIFELONGDEMOCRAT, AND ALTHOUGH NOT TAKING PART IN POLITICS HE REPEATEDLY REFUSEDTO ACCEPT OFFICE. HE BECAME CHAIRMAN OF THE TOWNSHIP COMMITTEE. HE WAS AGENTLEMAN WELL THOUGHT OF IN HIS TOWNSHIP AND A GOOD REPRESENTATIVE OFTHE CAREFUL, THRIFTY, PROGRESSIVE FARMER. HE ALWAYS LIVED ON THE THORNALHOMESTEAD. Thornal, Israel (I2152)
 
271 UNUSUALLY TALENTED SAYS CARRIE ST.JOHN. COULD LOCATE ARTICLES ABOUTWHICH HE KNEW NOTHING. ESP? PUBLISHED A LITTLE BOOK OF MATHEMATICALPUZZLES. Reno, Lionel Besent? (I1888)
 
272 VAN ALSTYNE, Lawrence.
Diary of an Enlisted Man.

Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback

http://www.bookbase.com/search;jsessionid=9882E5D4C586544072B814714C126091?dealer_login=gsmco&bookId=49704&method=POST

VAN ALSTYNE, Lawrence. Diary of an Enlisted Man. New Haven, Conn.: The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company, 1910. 1st ed. x, 348 pp. Frontis. port. Spine label removed, else a very good copy in orig. pictorial cloth with bookplate of Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States Commandery of the State of Illinois. "An excellent example of how a soldier's writing and style improved as he progressed in the preparation of this memoir." Nevins I, p. 172.

Stock number: 49704.

$US 150.00
 
Van Alstyne, Lawrence (I7177)
 
273 VERSED ALSO IN THE CHEMIST'S PROFESSION. PRESENT AT BATTLE OF LAKE ERIEIN WAR OF 1812. Reno, Benjamin (I1023)
 
274 Was a captain in the First Company, Third Battalion of the Tryon CountyMilitia, under Colonel Visscher. The following incident transpired in thespring of 1780, in the Mohawk Valley. The facts were related to theauthor by John S. Quackenboss, and Isaac Covenhoven, the latter one ofthe actors: -
George Cuck, a Tory who had become somewhat notorious from his havingbeen engaged with the enemy at Oriskany, Cherry Valley and elsewhere,entered the valley of the Mohawk late in the fall of 1779, with the viewof obtaining the scalps of Capt. Jacob Gardenier, and his Lieut. AbrahamD. Quackenboss, (father of John S.) for which the enemy had offered alarge bounty. Cuck was seen several times in the fall, and one occasionwhile sitting upon a rail fence, was fired upon by Abraham Covenhoven, aformer Whig neighbor.
The ball entered the rail upon which he sat, and he escaped. As nothingmore was seen of him after that event, it was generally supposed he hadreturned to Canada. At this period, a Tory by the name of John VanGuyler, residing in a small dwelling which stood in a then retired spot,a few rods south of the present residence of Major James Winne, in thetown of Glen. Van Guyler had three daughters, and although he lived somedistance from neighbors, and a dense forest intervened between hisresidence and the river settlements, several miles distant, the youngwhigs would occasionally visit his girls. Tory girls, I must presume,sometimes made agreeable sparkes, or sparkers, especially in sugar time.
James Cromwell, a young man who lived near the Mohawk, went out onepleasant summer evening in the month of March, to see one of Van Guyler'sdaughters.
Most of the settlers then made maple sugar and Cromwell found his fairDulcinia boiling sap in the sugarbush. While they were sparking it's theterm for courting in the country, the girl, purhaps thinking her namewould soon be Mrs. Cromwell, became very confiding and communicative. Shetold her beau that the Tory Cuck, was at their house. Cromwell at firstappeared incredulous - "He is surely there", said she, "and when anyonevisits the house, he is secreted under the floor". The report of hishaving been seen in the fall instantly recurred to his mind, and from theearnestness of the girl, he believed her story. Perhaps Cromwell wasaware that the girl when with him was inclined to be whiggisle - be thatas it may, he resolved instantly to set about ascertaining the truth orfalsehood of the information. In a very short time he complained of beingmade suddenly ill, from eating too much sugar. The girl whose sympathywas aroused, thinking from his motions that he was badly griped, finallyconsented to let him go home and hands upon his bowels, and groaningfearfully until he was out of sight and hearing of his paramour, when thepains left him. Taking a direct course through the woods, he reached thedwelling of Capt. Jacob Gardinier, some four miles below his own, andwithin the present village of Fultonville, about 12 o'clock at night, andcalling him up, told him what he had heard.
Capt. Gardinier sent immediately to his Lieut. Quackenboss, to select adozen stout hearted men and meet them as soon as possible at his house.The lieutenant inquired what business was on hand - the messengerreplied, "Captain Gardinier said I should tell you that there was a blackbear to be caught." In a short time the requisite number of whigs hadassembled, and the captain, taking his lieutenant aside, told him theduty he had to perform. He declined going himself on account of illhealth, and intrusted the enterprise to his lieutenant. He directed himto proceed with the utmost caution, as the foe was no doubt armed, and ashis name was a terror in the valley, to kill him at all hazards. Theparty well armed, set off on the mission. The snow yet on the ground wascrusted so hard, that it bore them, and having the advantage of a brightmoon-light night, they marched rapidly forward. Halting a quarter of amile from Van Guyler's house, the lieutenant struck up a fire, and as hismen gathered around an ignited stump, he addressed them nearly asfollows: "My brave lads! It is said the villian Cuck, is in yonder house,secreted beneath the floor. The object of our visit is to destroy him. Heis a bold and desparate fellow - doubtless well armed, and in probabilitysome of us must fall by his hand. Those of you, therefore, who declineengaging in so dangerous an undertaking, are now at liberty to returnhome." "We are ready to follow where you dare to lead", was the responseof one and all. "It is yet too early", said the lieutenant, and whilethey were waiting for the return of day, the plan of attack was agreedupon. At the stump was assembled Lieut. Quackenboss, Isaac and AbrahamCovenhoven, twin brothers, John Ogden, Jacob Collier, Abraham J, andPeter Quackenboss, Martin Gardinier, James Cromwell, Gilbert Van Alstyne,Nicholas, son of Capt. Gardinier, a sergeant, Henry Thompson, andNIcholas Quackenboss, also a sergeant. It was agreed that the partyshould separate and approach the house in different directions, so as notto arouse suspicion. The appearance of a light in the dwelling was thesignal for moving forward, and selecting Ogden, Collier, and Abraham J.Quackenboss to follow him, the lieutenant led directly to the house. Asthey approached it, a large watchdog met them with his yelping, whichcaused the opening of a little wooden slide over a loophole forobservation, by a member of the family; but seeing only four persons, theinmates supposed they were sugar-makers. On reaching the door and findingit fastened, the soldiers instantly forced it - the family - as may besupposed, were thrown into confusion by the unexpected entrance of armedmen. "What do you want here?" demanded Van Guyler. "The tory GeorgeCuck", was the lieutenant's reply. Van Guyler declared that the object oftheir search was not in his house. The three daughters had already got tothe sugar-works, and their father expressed to Lieut. Quackenboss, hiswish to go there too. He was permitted to go, but thinking it possiblethat Cuck might also have gone there, several men then approaching thehouse, were ordered to keep an eye on his movement. Abraham Covenhovenwas one of the second party who entered the house. There was a darkstairway which led to an upper room, in which it was thought the objectof their search might be secreted. Covenhoven was in the act of ascendingthe stairs with his gun aimed upward, and ready to fire, as Abraham J.Quackenboss drew a large chest from the wall on one side of the room,disclosing the object of their search.
Discharging a pistol at Nicholas Gardinier, the tory sprang out beforeQuackenboss, who was so surprised that he stood like a statue, exclaiming"Dunder! Dunder! Dunder!" The wary lieutenant was on his guard, and asCuck leaped upon the floor from a little cellar hole, made on purpose forhis accomodation, he sent a bullet through his head, carrying with it theeye opposite. He fell upon one knee, where the lieutenant ordered the twocomrades beside him to fire. Ogden did so, sending a bullet through hisbreast, and as he sank to the floor, Collier, placing the muzzle of hisgun near his head, blew out his brains. Thus ended the life of a man, whoin an evil hour, had resolved to imbrue his hands in the blood of hisformer neighbors and countrymen.
After his death, it was ascertained that Cuck had entered the valley latein the fall - that he had been concealed at the house of this kindredspirit, who pretended neutrality in the contest, whose retired situationfavored the plans of his guest, and was watching a favorable opportunityto secure the scalps mentioned and return to Canada. The making of maplesugar he had supposed would favor his intentions, as an enemy wasunlooked for so early in the season, and the persons whose scalps hesought, would probably expose themselves in the woods. He had intended,if possible, to secure both scalps in one day, and by a hasty flight,pursue the nearest route to Canada. Cuck was a native of Tryon County,and was born not many miles from where he died. - Van Guyler was madeprisoner by the party, and lodged in the jail at Johnstown; from which hewas removed not long after to Albany. 
Gardenier, Jacob Capt. (I1137)
 
275 WAS A LT. COLONEL OF THE 7TH REGIMENT IN 1777.,COMMANDED THE 7THRENSSELAER REGIMENT FROM THE REVOLUTION UP TO 1797 WHEN HE RESIGNED.
following per Lester Van Alstine book, pg56-57:
He lived at Poelsburgh, now in town of Stuyvesant. He was a Colonel ofthe Renssaelaerwyk Regiment from 1775 to 1798 and with a part of hiscommand in Tryon County, New York, at several periods during theRevolution. There were some 53 Van Alstynes serving their country assoldiers during the Revolution. He married his cousin Maritje Van Alstyne. 
Van Alstyne, Phillipus Col. (I4545)
 
276 Was a torpedoman aboard the submarine U.S.S. Albacore during Second WorldWar. Died at sea December, 1944. Pieringer, Charles Frances Jr (I4620)
 
277 WAS ADMITTED TO THE WINDSOR CHURCH OCT.11, 1640.
MAY 3, 1643 HE HAD GRANTED HIM FROM THE PLANTATION 40 ACRES OF LAND.
RESIDED IN FARMINGTON FROM 1652-1660 WHEN HE RETURNED TO WINDSOR, AND WASA DEACON OF THE CHURCH.
HE WAS DEPUTY TO GENERAL COURT IN 1666-1667, ALSO FROM 1675 TO 1687.
HIS MONUMENT IS STILL PRESERVED IN THE WINDSOR BURYING GROUND.
HIS WILL IS PRESERVED IN THE PROBATE OFFICE AT HARTFORD, AND HIS NAME ISSIGNED JOHN LOOMYS. THE WILL IS DATED AUG.27, 1688, AND IT MENTIONS LANDON BOTH SIDES OF THE CONNECTICUT RIVER. 
Loomis, Deacon John (I679)
 
278 WAS BRITISH PRISONER OF WAR IN WAR OF 1776. Thornall, Benjamin (I2466)
 
279 WAS BRITISH PRISONER OF WAR IN WAR OF 1776. SO WAS HIS FATHER AT SAMETIME. THE BRITISH ALSO DROVE FROM THEIR FARM 27 HEAD OF CATTLE. THEPRISONERS WERE TAKEN TO N.Y.C. TO WHAT WAS THEN KNOWN AS THE 'SUGARHOUSE'. BENJAMIN DIED IN PRISON. ISRAEL WAS EXCHANGED AND RETURNED HOME,BECAME A LARGE AND PROSPEROUS FARMER, AND A PROMINENT MAN IN THE TOWNSHIP. Thornal, Israel (I2419)
 
280 WAS DISOWNED FROM GOSHEN FRIENDS MEETING FOR BEING MARRIED BY AMAGISTRATE AND TO A PERSON NOT A QUAKER. INHERITED 375 POUNDS FROM HERFATHER'S ESTATE. HER 6 SISTERS INHERITED SUMS FROM 250 TO 375 POUNDS.BROTHERS CALEB AND EZRA WERE EXECUTORS OF THEIR FATHER'S ESTATE. Hoopes, Hannah (I955)
 
281 WAS DONALD MAURICE ST.JOHN'S "COUSIN CHARLES". DIED AT 44 OTSEGO ST.,CANAJOHARIE, NY Van Alstine, Charles Edgar (I1194)
 
282 Was entitled to a pension. Was a private in Capt. Reinier Van Everen'sCo. 1st Battalion, New York Militia, under Lt. Col. Samuel Clyde; engagedin the battles of Oriskany, Johnstown and Sharon. Born and died inCanajoharie, NY.
He rode express between Albany and Cherry Valley (NY) when the danger wasvery great, leaving Albany on horseback at 3:00 o'clock P.M., changinghis horse at some place where he was acquainted, arrived home after dark;left at 9:00 P.M., via Frey's Bush; passed within one half a mile ofBrant and Butler's encampment about 12:00 o'clock and arrived at 1:00A.M. at Cherry Valley; delivered his papers and returned home the samenight the same way. He was not at that time aware that the enemy was sonear, for it was the next day when the burning and massacre of CherryValley took place, of which you can form no idea unless you read adescription of it in some history of the Revolution. The "Annuls ofTyron County" has an account of it.
When the law was passed that all Revolutionary soldiers by applyingcould receive a pension, it was mentioned to him by a friend of his thathe could come in for his share, he was indignant and answered, "That hehad fought for his country, but not for money." When my sister Ann andmyself asked him if he would not allow us to apply in his name and toldhim that we could name a number that were much better off than he was andsome who had never smelt gun-powder were receiving their hundred andthousands, he still refused and said: "It was meant to be so, it was onlyintended for those who were wounded and crippled through means of it andfor those under oath say they were poor and destitute of the necessariesof life. For all such who had a comfortable home and the necessaries oflife, not the luxuries, should never ask for a pension and never would ifthey were true to their country and good soldiers."
He served under General Herkimer and Maj. J. Frey (who with his sons,built the Palatine Bridge home (Frey Place) in which Donald St.John lived- then his son, Richard.) 
Van Alstyne, Martin G. (I4873)
 
283 Was my Grandfather on my mother's side. Loman, Charles Nelson (I6016)
 
284 Was my grandmother on my mother's side. Johnson, Nellie M. (I15)
 
285 WAS SERGEANT OF HIS FATHER'S COMPANY, 1812. Stjohn, Sylvanus (I440)
 
286 WEINAND VON ALSTEIN (christening record)
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/IGI/individual_record.asp?recid=500102849665&lds=1®ion=11®ionfriendly=North+America&frompage=99

Microfilm:
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=142002&disp=Records+of+the+Zion+Evangelical+Lutheran%20%20&columns=*,180,0

Title
Records of the Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church in Rensselaerwyck and Greenbush ... 1785-1868

Stmnt.Resp.
transcribed by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society ; edited by Royden Woodward Vosburgh

Authors
Vosburgh, Royden Woodward (Added Author)
New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (Added Author)
Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church (West Sand Lake, New York) (Added Author)
First Evangelical Lutheran Church (West Sand Lake, New York) (Added Author)

Notes
Microfilm of typescripts (xxx, 331, 10, [2] leaves) made in New York City, 1913-1915, in possession of the New York State Library, Albany, New York.
Includes supplement with subscription lists, 1815, 1817, 1822, 1823.
Contains baptisms with birth dates, 1785-1868; marriages, 1816-1868; deaths and burials, 1817-1868; communion and confirmation lists, 1794-1849; confirmation lists and admissions, 1822-1848; alpha- betical list of members, 1824; registers of communicant members including deaths and marriages, 1830-1835; history of the church.
This church is now known as the First Evangelical Lutheran Church in West Sand Lake, Rensselaer County. Rensselaerwyck and Greenbush no longer exist as official localities in Rensselaer County, New York.

Subjects
New York, Rensselaer, West Sand Lake - Church records
New York, Rensselaer, West Sand Lake - Church history

Format
Manuscript (On Film)

Language
English

Publication
Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1968

 
Van Alstyne (VON ALSTEIN ), Wynant (WEINAND) (I9013)
 
287 WENT FROM FRANCE TO ENGLAND TO AMERICA 1699. SETTLED IN MANAKIN TOWN, VA. Renault, Philippe (I1246)
 
288 Went to Canada, later served as a captain in the British Army, with aCaptain Dorland immediately under his command. Both of these familieswere dropped from membership by the Quakers. Many of the New England, andsome New York Loyalists were leaving and going to the maritime part ofCanada. A neighbor of the Van Alstynes had been a prisoner of War at FortFrontenac (now Kingston) during the French Wars, and he recommended thatpart of the world to the others. So in the spring of 1783 about 189people under the leadership of Captain Peter Van Alstyne (he was usuallyreferred to as Major from here on) started out in wide flat bottomedboats up the Hudson River, up Lake Champlain, via the Richelie River toSorrel in Quebec. The severe winter overtook them at this point and theystayed in Sorrel all winter.
In the spring they went up the St.Lawrence as far as Adolphustown on theBay of Quinte. The fact that they chose boats and a water route, makes itsure that they were sea traders. It must have been a journey ofincredible hardship. Certainly not to be contemplated by man who hadyoung children or frail wives. Mrs. Peter Van Alstyne became ill afterthe Loyalists reached Sorrel, Quebec. Major Peter Van Alstyne had toleave his wife and family at Sorrel to bring his group of Loyalists toKingston, where he received the area in which they were to settle. Thenthey moved on to Adolphustown Township which had been assigned them. Thiswas in the summer of 1784. His wife died in Sorrel, and was buried thereon August 3, 1784. Major Peter Van Alstyne was the representative fromAdolphustown to the first legislative meeting of the new fivesettlements, (of United Empire Loyalists on the Bay of Quinte). AtAdolphustown there is a restored cemetery in a very beautiful settingalong the water. On the one side there is a bronze plaque to the memoryof his loyal and courageous followers. This is the reading on the plaquein the park at Adolphustown.

The Loyalists Landing Place 1784

On June 16, 1784, a party of some 250 United Empire Loyalists landedfrom bateaux near this site and established the first permanentsettlement in Adolphustown Township. They had sailed from New York in thefall of 1783 under the leadership of Major Peter Van Alstyne (1747-1811)a loyalist of Dutch ancestry and passed the winter in Sorrel. Van Alstynewas later appointed a justice of the peace, represented this area in thefirst Legislative assembly of Upper Canada, and built at Glenora, theearliest grist mill in Prince Edward County. 
Van Alstyne, Peter Major (I5362)
 
289 Wikipedia:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/mb8.html

Country Life in America as Lived by Ten Presidents of the United States:
http://books.google.com/books?id=vEz_oAodGhAC&pg=PA129&dq=%22Van+Aelsteyn%22&output=html&sig=kTPi6QivsGk54I0gURVo0G0qO5U


 
Van Buren, Martin Pres. (I6461)
 
290 Will of Williams Rathbun (Jr.) Book 9, Page 333 of records in Surragate'sCourt at Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.:
I, Williams Rathbun (age 53) make my Will as follows:
First - I give to my wife Mary [Chawgo] the use of the land I now occupyin said town being about forty acres, together with the right to getfirewood & timber to repair buildings etc on the above bequeathedpremises during her natural life. Together with one horse & wagon,cutter, & harness, together with all provisions laid up for family use,all stores in use in the house,, all the house hold furniture, with onecow that we call hers, the right to get wood & timber on any of the landthat I this day bequeathed to my son, with a right to get apples in theorchard what she may want for use. this is in place of all her right ofdower.
Second - I give to my son Jacob the use of the land he now occupies, itbeing about one hundred & seventy five acres, it being on lots No.30 & 33in Springfield Patent, during his natural life. after that I give it tohis oldest son.
Third, I give to my son Levant the use of the land he now occupies,together with the land that I this day bequeathed to his mother, duringher natural life, after her death, he is to have the use of the sameduring his life, it being about one hundred & ninety five in all of landsituated on lots Nos.33 & 34, in Springfield Patent. After that, to hisoldest son. The sawmill I give in the following manner: That is to say.Each one of my two sons is to have their equal portion of saw mill or theuse of it during their life time. After that, I give it to their oldestsons according as I have given my land to the same. With the saw milll isthe right of water mill, are with the above bequeathed premises.
Fourthly, I give to my daughter, Augusta, note of nine hundred dollarsagainst Lorenzo J. Van Alstine, dated m 1852. payable in five years withaccrued interest. Also, I give to my two sons, Jacob & Levant in equalportions, the remainder of my household furnmitures & farming utensils,tools of any description I now have. and my library, together with all myfarm stock, horses & cattle & sheep except the one year old colt which Igive to my grandson, Williams Rathbun Van Alstine. My gold watch I giveto grandson Arthur Van Alstine & lastly I give the remainder of my estateto my grandchildren, the children of my two daughters, Dorlisca, wife ofL. J. Van Alstine & Augusta wife of H. N. Tunnicliff, in the followingmanner:
My two excutors [sic], hereinafter named are to sell all land I may own,not herein bequeathed etc & what is left is to constitute a fund which isto be kept at interest, until said children arrive at age of 30 yrs whenany one arrives at age of 30 yrs, the children of my two daughters, so inlike manner to the last.
Jacob C. Rathbun & Levant W. Rathbun (sons) executors of theirfather's will - Dated Oct. 30, 1852. Williams Rathbun (LS)
T.B. Butingime East Springfield, Otsego Co., N.Y.
James Schofield East Springfield, Otsego Co., N.Y. (Witnesses) 
Rathbun, Williams Jr (I706)
 
291 WILL PROVED APRIL 12, 1550. Howland, John (I2954)
 
292 Will was probated Aug 24. Children listed were James, Adam, William,Mary Gamble, Henry, Elizabeth Leech. Beer's Washington Co. adds Samueland Andrew died young. Samuel was found in the 1880 census inParkersburg, W. Va. Devore, Andrew (I3515)
 
293 Woodson County, Kansas Births 1885-1928:

Van Allstein George, 27
Wilson Delverta, 18
M 1st Clarence Arthur
26 April 1890



1917 Draft Birth Registrations, Summit Co, Colo

BIRTH INFORMATION: RESIDENTS OF THIS COUNTY IN 1917-18
AND PERSONS WITH LINKS TO THIS COUNTY

Van Alstine, Clarence Arthur 26 Apr 1890 W TorontoKS Summit CO




Source of birth/death dates:ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/co/chaffee/cemeteries/faircemT_V.txtTranscription of Fairview Cemetery Salida, Chaffee Co, CO

FAIRVIEW CEMETERY
Salida, Chaffee County, Colorado


Contributed for use by the USGenWeb Project(http://www.usgenweb.org)Archives and
by the COGenWeb Project Archives(http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/co/cofiles.htm)
by the Author: June Shaputis - November 1996

Copyright (c) 1987 by June Shaputis from book CHAFFEECOUNTY,COLORADO, BURIALS.
All rights reserved except permission granted to reproduce ordistribute to
not-for-profit individuals or organizations.



VANALSTINE (VANALSTYNE), Albert G. 25 Jun 1908 - 23 Jul 1950 (Marker;Cem Rec: 31 Jul
1950, Sec. G, Blk 13, Lot 4, grave east side) (Salida Mail 25 Jul 1950)

VANALSTINE, Clarence A. 1890 - Nov 1918 (Marker; Cem Rec p. 60: 13 Nov1918, Sec. G,
Blk 13, Lot 4, N 1/2) (Salida Record 15 Nov 1918)

VANALSTINE, Delberta "Della" WILSON 9 Jul 1871 - 31 Dec 1959 (Marker;Cem Rec: 2 Jan
1960, Sec. G, Blk 13, Lot 4, G2) (Salida Mail 31 Dec 1959)

VANALSTINE, Elmer R. 18 May 1893 - 3 Feb 1942; Pvt 1 Cl., Med. Dep.,Colo. (Marker; Cem
Rec: 7 Feb 1942, Sec. G, Blk 13)

VANALSTINE, George Henry 24 May 1863 - 18 Sep 1935 (Marker; Cem Rec: 19Sep 1935,
Sec. G, Blk 13) (Salida Mail 20 Sep 1935)

Not sure the following is true...taken from website:
Clarence Arthur Van Alstyne was born on 26 Apr 1889. He died on 11 Nov1918. Parents: George Henry Van Alstyne Jr. and Delberta Edith Wilson.
He was married to Lila May Duncan on 12 Dec 1912. 
Van Alstyne, Clarence Arthur (I5961)
 
294 Worked for a railroad, then Rockefeller Estates. Came to America in 1902. Galgano, Samuel (I6490)
 
295 WORKED MOST OF ADULT LIFE FOR AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS CO. Van Alstine, K. Charlie (I8112)
 
296 WROTE: THE OLD FOLKS! WHERE ARE THEY?

MY CHILDHOOD HOME! VOICELESS BUT DEAR,
UNIQUE AS IN THE LONG-GONE DAY,
MY CHILDHOOD HOME. IT STILL IS HERE
BUT THE DEAR OLD FOLKS, WHERE ARE THEY?

THE GROVES, THE FIELDS ENROBED IN GREEN,
ENCHANT ME AS IN DAYS GONE BY;
THE CLOUDS ENFRINGED IN GOLDEN SHEEN,
YONDER IN QUIET GRANDEUR LIE.

ENSWATHED IN PEERLESS LIGHT, I SEE
THE SUN FROM MORN TO EVENTIDE
IN GRAND AND FADELESS MAJESTY,
FROM EAST TO WEST IN GLORY RIDE.

KING NIGHT RETURNS. HIS EBEN THRONE,
BESTUD WITH COUNTLESS, OLD-TIME STARS,
ORION, PLEIADES, NONE ARE GONE,-
LED CALMLY ON BY REGAL MARS.

THE CHILDREN OF THAT OLDEN HOUR,
THEY GATHER ROUND ME HERE TODAY;
MATURE AND STALWART, MEN OF POWER,
BUT THE DEAR OLD FOLKS, WHERE ARE THEY?

IN GLORY! HEAVEN! THEIR WORK WELL DONE,
AMID THE HAPPY, BLOODWASHED THRONG,
WITH SAINTS AND ANGELS ROUND THE THRONE,
THEY SING THE VICTORS JOYFUL SONG.
JULY 13, 1896 
Thickstun, Rev. Thomas Freeman (I1056)
 
297 WW II VETERAN. Beswick, Herman (I2875)
 
298 WW II VETERAN. Beswick, Charles (I2877)
 

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