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151 GRANDFATHER OF PRESIDENT MARTIN VAN BUREN. Van Buren, Martin Peterse (I4554)
 
152 GRANDMOTHER OF PRESIDENT MARTIN VAN BUREN. Van Alstyne, Dirckje 2Nd (I4555)
 
153 GUARD OF THE KING, AFTERWARDS CAPTAIN OF CAVALRY. Renault, Thomas Joseph (I1236)
 
154 HAD 41 PATENTS. Kunst, Alexander Frederik Heer Van Almelo (I942)
 
155 HAD AN OFFICE AT 1306 MARQUETTE BLDG, CHICAGO, IL Reno, Henry Clay (I1510)
 
156 Had seven children with Joanne whose births are recorded in St. ThomasChurch, Salisbury, Eng.; she died soon after their removal to Warwick, R.I. They left Hampton, Eng., April 6, 1635, with six children,, one havingdied; settled in Salem, Mass., removing to Warwick, 1642-3. Greene, Surgeon John (I844)
 
157 HANUARY 5, 1777, BECAME COLONEL OF THE 7TH REGIMENT. Van Alstyne, Abraham A. (I4544)
 
158 HAROLD AND WIFE WERE MEMBERS OF PLEASANT GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH,HUNTINGTON TWP, HUNTINGTON CO, IN. Dolby, Harold (I3636)
 
159 He is the author of the first Declaration for Freedom in the Colonies,the May 21, and 25th 1775 Tryon County Committee of Safety Resolution,which was over a full year before the Continent wide Declaration ofIndependence. Yates, Christopher Peter (I5316)
 
160 HE LIVED IN DAYS WHEN ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION WAS SCARCE AND TOUGH.WRESTLING WITH NO HOLDS BARRED WAS A FAVORITE. HE AND ANOTHER WERE HARDAT IT WHEN HE WAS IN DANGER OF LOSING AN EYE, SO HE BIT THE MAN'S THUMBOFF. THE NEIGHBOR TOOK IT TO COURT WHICH WAS AGAINST THE RULES ANDGR-GRANDFATHER WAS INCENSED OVER IT. WHEN THE JUDGE AWARDED THE NEIGHBOR$5.00 TO BE PAID THEN AND THERE, GR-GRANDFATHER ROLLED OFF TWO BILLS.THE JUDGE SAID: 'NO, MR. RENO, I SAID $5.00.', AND GR-GRANDFATHER SAID,'THAT'S FOR THE OTHER ONE, AND I'LL GET IT WHEN I CAN.'. (letter fromCarrie St.John to Roger Reno, April 23, 1977) Reno, Martin Luther (I958)
 
161 He was a captain in his father's (Peter Yates) regiment. Yates, Jacob (I5318)
 
162 HER AUNT MARY LYON FOUNDED MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE.
ANOTHER AUNT MARRIED MR. LORD WHO WAS THE FIRST TO TRANSLATE THE BIBLEINTO CHINESE. 
Lyon, Sophronia Miner (I2264)
 
163 Her husband, often an invalid, died 2/15/1869. On returning from hisburial, she (apparently in her usual good health), at once began givingto her children such of her belongings as she especially wished each tohave, going about it exactly as a person would who was about to take ajourney from which they might not return. She gave minute directions,and in the same quiet manner in which she went about the most ordinaryaffairs of life.
When these things were attended to she went to bed and never arose,dying two weeks after her husband died. Her physician could discover nophysical ailment to which her death was due. Her work was done. 
Wyatt, Penelope (I7131)
 
164 Heroine of the Revolution. During the raids of the Indians and Tories inthe Mohawk Valley, when her husband was serving as a scout, she called her neighbors together and led them to a place of safety. Her life was once spared by an Indian, who said she was a brave woman and they would not molest her. She died in Madison County, N.Y. and by her request her Dutch books were buried with her.

From:
http://books.google.com/books?id=4TkEAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

THERE was developed in many of the pioneer women of
our early days a masculine masterfulness and audacity
which, coupled with natural resourcefulness,
carried them through some trying situations
where sheer courage might have failed.
Such was the actuating spirit of Nancy Van
Alstyne, a heroine of the Mohawk Valley, whose
deeds are yet a part of the storied traditions
told about the firesides of central New York.

Mrs. Van Alstyne was born near Canajoharie,
in 1733, and reared in a community in which
Indians were more common than white men.
Her father, old Peter Quackenbush, was an
Indian trader, and as his supply of goods was
seemingly inexhaustible and he carried many
things that the other traders did not, the Indians
came to half believe what he claimed—that he
was under the especial care of the Great Spirit.

When she was yet but a roystering, fun-
loving girl of eighteen, Nancy Quackenbush
was married to Martin J. Van Alstyne, and went
to live in the old Van Alstyne mansion, a few
miles from her father's home. Her husband
was a prosperous farmer and trader whose
business called him away from home much
of his time, and so the management of their
property at home fell largely to her, and this
and the care of the rapidly growing family filled
the time of the good woman for many years.
During the latter part of the war for independence,
no section of the country passed through
greater vicissitudes than the Mohawk Valley,
the home of the Six Nations. The Iroquois,
holding loyalty almost feudal to Sir William
Johnson, had been drawn by him to side with
the English in the French and Indian War.
Dying shortly before the Revolution, Johnson
had passed his authority on to his son, Sir John
Johnson, ever an adherent of King George.

The Indians at first were at a loss to understand
why there should be enmity between the settlers
and the English, where before there had been
amity, but they felt that it was no affair of
theirs, and so, while they were glad to get the
brass kettles and clothing, the old muskets
and powder that St. Leger and Johnson gave
them, and in return to harry a few settlements
where there was little risk to run and a chance
for rum and plunder, they took little real interest
in the contest until the Battle of Oriskany,
where a little band of Provincials fought them
in their own fashion and with fearful slaughter.

After Oriskany, in 1777, the Indians of the
Mohawk Valley had their own revenge to work
out, and British agents, stirring up mischief
and offering bounties for scalps, kept them at
fever heat. From this came the massacres of
Wyoming and Cherry Valley and German flats,
and the devastation of Cobleskill and Schoharie,
and eventually led to the driving out of the
Iroquois themselves. During 1778 and 1779
the activities of the Indians elsewhere had given
the Mohawk Valley comparative peace, though
the settlers were in constant suspense. In the
spring of 1780, the Indians, infuriated by the
awful desolation left behind General Sullivan's
raid, were eager for retaliation. A little later
they were joined by Brant with his renegade
Tories and Indians, and the devastation of the
Mohawk Valley began.

In August, a little band of Indians visited
the settlement. Mr. Van Alstyne and most of
the other men were away. The women and
children were terror-stricken when word was
brought that the Indians were coming. Calling
them together, Mrs. Van Alstyne advised that
they all cross over to an island which her husband
owned, near the opposite side of the river,
taking such things as they could carry. She
knew that the Indians, being a small party,
would not remain long, and thought that if they
found the houses partially emptied they would
be led to think that the settlement had been
abandoned. In a short time the seven families
comprising the settlement were on the island,
Mrs. Van Alstyne going last. Barely had they
secreted themselves when they heard the shouting
and soon saw the smoke from their burning
homes. The Van Alstyne home was the only
one left standing, the chief saying, "Let the
old wolf keep his den," as Mr. Van Alstyne was
afterward told by an Indian who had been present
and who said that the chief knew that the "
old wolf" had been a friend of Sir John or his
house would have been burned. The families
returned to the smoking ruins of their cabins
the next morning and made shift to stay with
Mrs. Van Alstyne until it was felt safe to rebuild
their own homes.

Some months later three men from Cana-
joharie, who had deserted from the Provincial
army and joined the enemy, came back to spy
aroxind and report on the condition of their old
neighbours. They were caught and hanged as
spies, one of them being executed in VanAlstyne's
orchard. When the spies did not return, several
Indians were sent to see what had become
of them. The Indians chanced to reach the
settlement the day of the execution, and soon
the action was reported to Brant, the half-
breed chief, who immediately sent a party to
retaliate. They took awful toll. With the exception
of the Van Alstyne home, there was not
one out of which there was not some member
killed or carried into captivity. It was said
afterward that Brant had given orders that the
Van Alstyne house should not be destroyed. If
so, it was as far as his protection went. The
Indians came upon them by surprise when Mr.
Van Alstyne was away from home. The good
woman saw her most cherished possessions
carried away or broken up. Valuable articles
brought from Holland were wantonly broken and
scattered. She possessed a large mirror which,
as the Indans passed several times, she came
to hope that it would be spared. But soon two
of the young Indians laid the mirror on the floor
and, leading in a colt from the stable, walked
him back and forth across it until it was a mass
of fragments. A half-grown Indian boy, seeing
a pair of inlaid buckles on the shoes worn by the
aged mother of Mr. Van Alstyne, snatched the
shoes from her feet, cut the buckles off, and flung
the shoes at her head. Another tore the knit
shawl from around her shoulders, threatening
to kill her if she resisted. The oldest daughter,
seeing a young savage carrying a hat and cape
which her father had recently brought to her
from Philadelphia, snatched them away from
him and, in the struggle which ensued, pushed
him down and then fled to a pile of hemp, where
she hid them. The other Indians laughed and
cheered and prevented the discomfited buck
from interfering with her further. A quantity
of milk and cream stood in stone crocks in the
kitchen. The Indians emptied the contents
over the floor and broke the jars. The Indians
bribed a man-servant, by promising him immunity,
to tell them where Mrs. Van Alstyne had
hidden several valuable articles. One was a
barrel of clothing, not yet made up. Mrs. Van
Alstyne had just concluded cutting out the winter
clothing for her family, which included her
husband and herself and twelve children, Mr.
Van Alstyne's old mother, two black servants,
and the white man who revealed the hiding
place. Mrs. Van Alstyne entreated him not to
tell where the articles were hidden and assured
him that he would surely be punished and not
rewarded by the Indians. Sure enough, when
they left they bound him and carried him away.

It was a sorry-looking house that the Indians
left. Windowless and with the doors broken
down, it was a poor protection for a family
almost without clothing or anything to cover
them. More than that, there was nothing to
eat and no way to get anything. Their few-
neighbours were still worse off, as those who
had not been killed or carried away were suffering
from their wounds. However, the sufferers
were cared for, windows and doors boarded up,
and fires built in the chimney-places. Mrs. Van
Alstyne set her children to pounding corn and
making samp and cakes that they might be fed.
So things went for a day or two, but the good
woman was sorely troubled at the lack of clothing.
She tried spinning flax mixed with the
silk of milkweed and weaving it. It was a
smooth and serviceable cloth, but it would have
taken until the following spring to have clothed
the family. Then she became desperate.

When her husband returned, she urged that
he and the other men who had been robbed
join together and make an effort to rescue their
property from the Indian "castle," a score or so
of miles away, where she thought it might have
been taken. He thought it impossible. Then
she determined to go herself. Taking her son
John, aged sixteen, and their remaining horse
she started. The snow lay deep on the ground,
but they finally reached the Indian village and
drove to the main house, the "castle," where
Mrs. Van Alstyne knew that she would be apt
to find the best of the plunder. The Indians
had all gone on a hunt, and only an old squaw
remained. When Mrs. Van Alstyne asked for
food, the squaw hesitated. "No Indian ever
came hungry to my house and was refused food,"
said Mrs. Van Alstyne. The squaw sullenly
set about preparing some food. The good
woman saw her own kitchen utensils brought
out for use, and when the Indian woman took a
bucket and went for water she gathered up such
articles as she recognised and told her son to put
them in their sleigh, which he did. Just then
the squaw returned and asked by whose order
she had taken the things. "

They are mine," said Mrs. Van Alstyne. The
Indian woman showed signs of resistance, but
Mrs. Van Alstyne took from her pocket a paper
and handed it to her, saying: "This comes from
Yankee Peter (probably Peter Schuyler), and
says for you to give me all my things."
Whatever may have been the virtue of Yankee
Peter's name cannot be told at this time, but
it proved efficacious, and Mrs. Van Alstyne and
her son gathered together many of her articles,
including considerable of the family clothing,
and put it in their sleigh. Then, going to the
stables, she found two of her husband's horses,
which she tied behind her sleigh and started
for home. The family passed a sleepless night,
as it was certain that the Indians would come
after the horses, if nothing else.

Sure enough, soon after daylight a little
party of Indians appeared in sight. Van Alstyne
wanted his wife to give the horses up, but she
would not "without an argument," as she said,
and, telling him to remain in the house while
she talked to them, out she went. The Indians
started first to the stable. She followed, with
most of her weeping family behind her. "
What do you want?" she demanded, reaching
the stable first and turning around. "
Ugh! Want horses," was the gruff reply. "
Well, you can't have them. They're my
horses, and you came and took them without
right." She was standing in front of the stable
door. The chief approached threateningly and
pulled her to one side and then reached for the
pin that held the door shut. She pushed him
away, and when he drew his rifle to his shoulder
and was taking aim she said, "I dare you to
shoot," looking him squarely in the eyes.
Slowly the gun was let down and he turned to his
companions, saying: "Ugh! devil in old woman!"
He turned to depart and the others gave a shout
of approbation. On their way back the Indians
stopped at the home of Captain Frey, a Tory
neighbour, and told the story, saying that the
white woman's bravery had saved her property,
and that if there had been fifty men along the
Mohawk as brave as the wife of " Big Tree" (Mr.
Van Alstyne) the Indians would never have
troubled them. The chief also told Captain
Frey that the "white squaw would make heap
bad fight."

Mrs. Van Alstyne lived to be the mother of
fifteen children, the youngest of whom was born
after she was fifty years old. She was ninety-
eight years of age when she passed away, a
remarkably well preserved and intelligent old
lady, loved and honoured the whole length of
the Mohawk Valley. She died and was buried
in Nampsville, Madison County, where many of
her descendants may be found.
 
Quackenbush, Nancy (I4279)
 
165 HIS GREAT-GRANDFATHER WAS THE PROPRIETOR OF A LARGE TRACT OF LAND,EMBRACING ABOUT 1300 ACRES, WHICH HE CAME IN POSSESSION OF AND SETTLEDUPON ABOUT 1780. THIS PROPERTY DESCENDED TO HIS NINE CHILDREN, LEVANTOWNING A PORTION OF IT.
LEVANT WAS BORN ON THE OLD HONESTEAD. HE RECEIVED AN ACADEMICALEDUCATION. WHEN HE ATTAINED HIS MAJORITY HE ENGAGED IN FARMING, WHICHOCCUPATION HE HAS SINCE FOLLOWED, IN CONNECTION WITH THE MILLING BUSINESSESTABLISHED BY HIS FATHER. FULLY APPRECIATED BY HIS FELLOW TOWNSMEN, HEHAS BEEN CALLED TO MANY POSITIONS OF TRUST.. FOR FIFTEEN YEAR5S HE WASASSESSOR OF THE TOWN, SUPERINTENDENT OF THE POOR FOR THREE YEARS, ANDSUPERVISOR TWO TERMS.. LIKE HIS FATHER HE HAS TAKEN A LIVELY INTEREST INEDUCATIONAL MATTERS, AND HAS DONE MUCH IN THAT DIRECTION. 
Rathbun, Levant Williams (I3238)
 
166 http://books.google.com/books?id=Bf0LAAAAYAAJ&dq=alstyne&as_brr=1&pg=PA193

Will of Thomas van Alstyne

[302] In the name of God, Amen. Know all men by these presents that on this fifteenth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty-four, I, Thomas van Alstyn, of the township of Kinderhook, in the county of Albany, in the province of New York, being advanced in years, but having my memory and understanding perfect, considering the shortness of human life, the certainty of death and the uncertain hour thereof, have determined this to be my last will and testament in manner following.

First, I commend my immortal soul whenever it shall depart from my body to the gracious and merciful hands of God my Creator and Savior and my body to a Christian burial in the earth from whence it came, there to rest until my soul and body be reunited at that joyful day of the resurrection to be made partaker of that insatiable joy of our salvati'on which God by His grace through the merits of Jesus Christ has prepared and promised for all those who have true repentance and faith in Him. And as regards such temporal estate, as money, obligations, goods, rights and credits, nothing in the world excepted, where and whatsoever they may be, I order and dispose thereof as follows. I desire that all my just debts shall first be paid out of my above-mentioned estate.

[303] Item, I give and bequeath to my son Wiliam Van Alystyn in consideration of his right of primogeniture of being my eldest son, my large shot gun. 7

Item. I give and bequeath to my son William Van Alstyn and his heirs forever the farm which he now has in his possession and dwells upon, with all the rights thereto appertaining, lying in Claverack in the manor of Rensselaerswick and in the county of Albany upon this condition that my son William or his heirs therefor pay the sum of one hundred pounds current money of this province, which is still owing on that land, and furthermore, after my wife's death, that my son William pay or disburse to my daughter Cathariena Hofman, widow of Petrus Hoffman, or her heirs, the sum of forty pounds current money of this province, if it goes well with the woodland which I have conveyed to my five children; if not, my son William must pay to the aforenamed Cathariena the sum of sixty pounds current money aforenamed.

Item. I give and bequeath to my son Lambarth Van Alstyn and his heirs forever the farm which he now possesses and occupies, lying in the township of Kinderhook in the county of Albany.

Item. I give and bequeath to my son Peter Van Alstyn and his heirs forever my whole farm as I now possess the same, with all the farm implements thereto belonging, after the death of my wife, on this condition that my son [304] Peter or his heirs pay therefor to my son Lambarth or his heirs the sum of four hundred pounds current money of this province, the first payment of one hundred pounds two years after my death, the second payment also of one hundred pounds four years after my death, the third payment again of one hundred pounds six years after my death, the fourth payment again of one hundred pounds eight years after my death; from this time forth my son Peter is to have the half of the whole income of my farm and is also to be at half of the expense of the whole and after my death my son Peter is to have the whole income of my farm, provided that he is to give to my wife during her life the fourth of the income, and also a free dwelling, also pay all my debts. Furthermore my son Peter or his heirs must pay or disburse to my daughter Maria or her heirs the sum of forty pounds current money of this province if it goes well with the woodland which I have conveyed to my five children; if not, my son Peter must pay to my aforenamed daughter Maria or her order the sum of sixty pounds current money as above.

Item. I give and bequeath to my two daughters Catharina and Maria and their heirs after my wife's death all my movables and household furniture except my sons' pictures, of which each shall have his own; furthermore I give to my daughter Cathariena or her heirs my negress named Alloon and to my daughter Maria or her heirs I give my negress named [305] Anne.

Item. I give and bequeath to my son Peter or his heirs my negro named Lott.

Item. I give and bequeath to my five above-named children, William, Lambarth, Peter, Cathariena and Maria, and to their heirs all my silver work, nothing excepted, to be equally divided among them, to the one no more than to the other.

Item. I give and bequeath to my son William and his heirs my brew kettle for which he is to pay three milch cows, one to my son Lambarth, one to my daughter Cathariena and one to my daughter Maria.

Item. I give and bequeath to my three sons, William, Lambarth and Peter Van Alstyn, to them and their heirs, my whole interest in the sawmill.

Item. I desire and order that if my aforenamed children or any of them be not content with what I have above bequeathed and given to them, but make further claims or pretensions on any part of my estate or on anything that I have heretofore sold or made over or conveyed, here or elsewhere, of whatsoever nature it may be, he who undertakes to do so shall be completely cut off from his inheritance or share herein bequeathed to him and my executors shall retain control of the same in order [306] to resist him according to my desire until the matter is settled, when they shall equally divide the remainder of the same among my other contented children and their heirs.

Item. I give and bequeath to my son Peter van Alstyn after my death all that lies within my fence, house, orchard and meadowland, which is now in possession of my son Lambarth, and it is my will and order that Lafnbarth shall turn over the same to my aforesaid son Peter.

Item. I give and bequeath to my son Peter van Alstyn and his heirs a parcel of hickory wood to the west of the high hill; also a piece of ground lying upon the west side of the Batten vly, between the ridge and said vly.

Item. Furthermore it is my will that my youngest daughter Maria shall remain at home with my son Peter until she marries.

Lastly, I nominate my worthy wife Maria van Alystyne and my son William van Alstyn and my friend Casparis Conyn, junr. executors of this my last will and testament and desire that in due time they shall pay my just debts which I may leave behind.

In witness of the truth hereof I have subscribed and sealed this and declared it to be my last will and testament, the day and year above written.

Thomas Van Alsten (l. s.)

Signed, sealed and declared by Thomas van Alstyn to be his last will and testament in presence of us as witnesses (the words " or their heirs," on the first page, were interlined before the signing and sealing hereof)

his

Petrns R X Coll, junr. mark

his

Seybout X Kranckheyt mark

Gerrit C. van Den Bergh

Albany
Countv


[307] Be it Remembered that on the 7 day of September 1765 Personally came and appeared before me

John Depeyster Surrogate of the said County Petrus Cool Jur of Kinderhook in said County of Albany and Gerret Van Den Bergh of the manner of Renselaer in sd County farmer and being duly Sworn on their Oaths Declared that they and Each of them did see Thomas Van Alsten sign & seal the within written Instrument pro- porting to be the will of the said Thom5. Van Alsten bearing date the 15 day of November one thousand Seven Hundred and sixty four and heard. him publish & Declare the same as and for his Last will and testament that att the time thereof he the said Thomas Van Alsten was of Sound Disposing mind and memory to the best of their Knowledge and belief of them the deponents and that there names Subscribed to the said will are of there Respective hand writing which they subscribd. as witnesses to the said will in the Testators presence and that they also saw the other witness Sybout Krankheyt sygn his name as witness to said will in the Testators presence

Jon. De Peyster Surrogate

I do hereby certify the preceding to be a truly Copy of the Original exd. & Compared the 6th day of October 1781

Pr Mat: Visscher Clk
 
Van Alstyne, Thomas (I4648)
 
167 http://books.google.com/books?id=FO9T8Pf7GdQC&vq=van%20alstyne&dq=%22VAN%20ALSTYNE%22&lr=&as_brr=1&pg=PA152


MRS FLORENCE BELL HARRINGTON 12398
Born in New York Wife of George Adelbert Harrington.

Descendant of Martin C Van Alstyne Nancy Quackenbush Van Alstyne and Adj John Van Driesen of New York.

Daughter of Lewis Sowter and Amanda M Richardson his wife.

Granddaughter of Orrin Richardson and Margaret Van Alstyne his wife.

Gr granddaughter of Abram Van Alstyne and Catalina Van Driesen his wife.

Gr gr granddaughter of Martin J Van Alstyne and Nancy Quackenbush his wife John Van Driesen and Margarita Truax his wife m 1770

Nancy Quackenbush Van Alstyne was a herione of the Revolution During the raids of the Indians and Tories in the Mohawk Valley when her husband was serving as a scout she called her neighbors together and led them to a place of safety Her life was once spared by an Indian who said she was a brave woman and they would not molest her. She died in Madison county 1831 aged ninety eight and by her request her Dutch books were buried with her.

John Van Driesen 1778 served as adjutant in the Albany county regiment commanded by Col Abraham Wemple.
He was born at Albany 1744  
Sowter, Florence Bell (I11993)
 
168 http://books.google.com/books?id=FO9T8Pf7GdQC&vq=van%20alstyne&dq=%22VAN%20ALSTYNE%22&lr=&as_brr=1&pg=PA345

MRS HELEN M BACON 12908
Born in New York Wife of George E Bacon

Descendant of Martin R Van Alstyne Nancy Quacken bush Van Alstyne and Adj John Van Driesen of New York.

Daughter of Clare L Spencer and Sarah A Sowter his wife.

Granddaughter of Lewis Sowter and Amanda Richardson his wife.

Gr granddaughter of Orrin Richardson and Margaret Van Alstyne his wife.

Gr gr granddaughter of Abram Van Alstyne and Catalina Van Drieser his wife.

Gr gr gr granddaughter of Martin R Van Alstyne and Nancy Quackenbush his wife John Van Driesen and Margaret Truax his wife.
 
Spencer, Helen M (I11997)
 
169 http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA143&dq=%22VAN+ALSTYNE%22&lr=&ei=u2FCSqb8FYeyyQT87sxG&id=FO9T8Pf7GdQC&as_brr=1&output=text

Mrs. Elizabeth Van Alstyne Rodgers. 12367

Born in New York.

Wife of Gilbert Edward Rodgers.

Descendant of Capt. William Van Alstyne, of New York.

Daughter of John Lawrence Van Alstyne, M. D., and Carolyn Shultz, his wife.

Granddaughter of Thomas Butler Van Alstyne, M. D., and Eliza Guile, his wife.

Gr.-granddaughter of Thomas Van Alstyne and Mabel Butler, his wife.

Gr.-gr.-granddaughter of William Van Alstyne and Catherine Knickerbocker, his second wife (m. 1762).

William Van Alstyne (1721-1802), who had served as an officer in the Colonial wars, enlisted as a private when the Revolution began. His name is found in the Eighth Albany county regiment, commanded by Col. Robert Van Rensse- laer. He is buried at Claverack. The wedding ring of Catherine Knickerbocker is now a valued relic, in the possession of her descendants.

 
Van Alstyne, Elizabeth (I11985)
 
170 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franco-Prussian_War

They arrived just 3 months before France declared war on Prussia. (The Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871)

The conflict was a culmination of years of tension between Prussia and France, which finally came to a head over the issue of a Hohenzollern candidate for the vacant Spanish throne, following the deposition of Isabella II in 1868. The public release of the Ems Dispatch, which played up alleged insults between the Prussian king and the French ambassador, inflamed public opinion on both sides. France mobilized, and on 19 July 1870 declared war on Prussia only, but the other German states quickly joined on Prussia's side.
 
Family F4081
 
171 http://history.rays-place.com/ny/hastings-ny.htm
Mallory is a station and post office on the R., W. & O. Railroad, north of Central Square, near the line of West Monroe. As early as 1810 Edward Smith built a saw mill on the east branch of Big Bay Creek. It finally passed to George W. Smith and thence to his son Jerome. From them the place was long known as Smith's Mills. In 1826 Peter and Cornelins Van Alstyne erected a grist mill which afterward passed into the possession of Isaac W. Brewster and D. C. Smith, who built another saw mill. The establishment was burned ía 1855 and the site came into the hands of Daniel Bowe, who erected a saw mill and conducted it for fifteen years, selling it to Mr. Wilcox. It was afterwards purchased by Joseph A. Courbat, the present owner, who has rebuilt the whole plant and now has a large stave, saw, and planing mill. For a time the place was known as "Brewsterville." Another saw mill was built by William Hobart and after many changes passed into the hands of Jared Mallory in 1857. The next year it was burned, but was soon rebuilt, and since then Mr. Mallory has prosecuted a thriving business. The first store was kept by Russell Winchester, and among the blacksmiths were Amariah Ricker, Newton S. Bowne, and Andrew J. De Bow. George Piguet and John Wyant are general merchants. The place also has a cheese factory owned by Jared Mallory, a grist mill, hotel, the usual shops and artisans, and about 150 inhabitants. It was named in honor of Jared Mallory, one of the prominent men of the town. through whose efforts a post-office was established there in 1858, the first postmaster being Bishop Hoyt. He died in 1866 and since then Jared Mallory has held the position.
 
Van Alstyne, Cornelis (I8618)
 
172 http://history.rays-place.com/ny/ren-greenbush-ny.htm
SUPERVISORS OF THE TOWN OF GREENBUSH - 1843 
Van Alstyne, Rinier (I5287)
 
173 http://www.canpal.org/HABS2.htm

Walter Scott Van Alstyne Jr wrote a letter regarding the Van Alstyne Homestead of Canajoharie.

"Description: Stone, story and a half, modified gambrel roof, and chimneys. Original interiors gone except mantel in south room (left). This has a paneled overmantel with delicate doric pilasters."

"Additional information: My great-great-great-great-great (5) grandfather Martin J. Van Alstyne built the stone house in Canajoharie. Most books and the marker in front of the house state that it was erected in 1749. This is probably not true. My ancestor (with another man, Henry [Hendrick] Scrembling), purchased a large tract at Canajoharie of about 700 to 1000 acres in the winter of 1729-30. They bought this land from Cadwalader Colden, sometime Lieutenant Governor of colonial New York. Colden was the original patentee from the crown. Colden recorded the transaction in question in his diary, which, in turn, has been published by the New York Historical Society. My ancestor proceeded to the site of Canajoharie immediately and from family data we have strong reason to believe the house was completed no later than 1739 and possibly as early as 1735. Scrembling, incidentally, did not stay in the picture for long since he sold out to Van Alstyne a very short time after they had arrived at the site of modern Canajoharie."

-Letter (dated July 16, 1953) from W. Scott (?) Van Alstyne Jr.
29 Sherman Terrace
Madison, Wisconsin
 
Van Alstyne, Walter Scott Jr. (I8764)
 
174 http://www.rag-time.com/fest/bio.htm

A grocery merchant who also served as a minister at the Methodist church in Marengo, Illinois.
 
Van Alstyne, Egbert Benson (I7684)
 
175 I am not sure, but there is a pretty good chance this was my Great Grandfather's brother, since he was slightly older, he also lived in Chatham, and he and his parents were from Ireland as well. Therefore, I am going to place him here, along with his family, although I am not absolutely sure at this point whether he was actually my Great Grandfather's brother. He immigrated in 1868. Dugan, Patrick (I47)
 
176 IF the same person as John G. Van Alsten, then the following letterapplies:
ESB-ORD-DVH
War Department
The Adjutant General's Office
Washington,
September 4, 1924
Respectfully returned to
Mrs. Philip H. Stowitts,
Canajoharie, Montgomery County,
New York
The records of this office show that one John G. Van Alsten (surname notborne as Van Alstine) served in the Revolutionary War as a private inCaptain Renir V. Every's Company, Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Clyde'sRegiment, New York Militia.
The period of his service is not stated. His name appears on areceipt roll witnessed September 29, 1784, in Canajohary District,Montgomery County, which shows that he received of Gerard Banker,Treasurer of the State of New York, Certificate No. 11225, in the amountof L4 as pay for his services.
The records show that this regiment was from Tryon County.
The collection of Revolutionary War records in this office is far fromcomplete, and it is suggested as a possibility that additionalinformation may be obtained from the Director, New York State Library,Albany, or from the Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, D.C.
Robert C. Davis, Major General, The Adjutant General

Johannes bought the farm at Canajoharie, NY 5/19/1790 for 400 poundsdeeded it to his grandson L. J. 7/26/1829. 
Van Alstyne, Johannes Gysbert (I710)
 
177 IN 1906 A TALENTED WEST CHESTER LAWYER PUBLISHED A BOOK ENTITLED "DOWNTHE EASTERN AND UP THE BLACK BRANDYWINE". ON PAGE 34 THE FOLLOWINGREFERENCE TO RICHARD IDDINGS, AN IMMIGRANT FROM WALES IS MADE CONCERNINGHIS WILL AND ESTATE:
IT WAS NOT A LARGE ESTATE THAT RICHARD LEFT BEHIND HIM...ONLY A FEW COWSAND THE SIMPLEST OF HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, CONSISTING OF "THREE BOWLS, TWO IRONPOTS AND TWO BOXES". A SHILLING APIECE WAS ALL THE TREASURE HE COULDLEAVE HIS CHILDREN...NO, NOT ALL... HE LEFT BESIDES, THE LEGACY OF A GOODMAN'S MEMORY. IN THE FEAR OF GOD HE LIVED, IN THE NAME OF GOD HE BEGANHIS LAST, PERHAPS HIS MOST IMPORTANT DOCUMENT: "IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN.I RICHARD IDDINGS BEQUEATH MY SOUL INTO THE HANDS OF ALMIGHTY GOD MYMAKER, HOPING THAT THROUGH THE MERITORIOUS DEATH AND PASSION OF JESUSCHRIST MY ONLY SAVIOUR TO RECEIVE FREE PARDON AND FORGIVENESS OF ALL MYSINS". "WHAT A QUAINT OLD WILL", EXCLAIMS ONE. "WHAT AN ANTIQUATED FORM"REMARKS ANOTHER. NAY, RATHER WHAT A NOBLE CONFESSION. WHAT A CONSOLATORYHOPE. WHAT A FITTING ENDING OF A SIMPLE LIFE. 
Iddings, Richard Sr. (I1029)
 
178 In the fall of 1862 he enlisted in Company A, 150th Regiment New YorkState Volunteers. The regiment did garrison duty at Baltimore, MD.,until the invasion of Pennsylvania in 1863, and then march toGettysburgh, where it received a baptism of fire such as fell to the lotof few regiments during the War of the Rebellion. He was among thosethat fell during the first engagement of July 3rd (?), being instantlykilled by a bullet through the head. He was buried on the field, in thethird row from the monument erected by the Government in memory of thosewho fell in the three days fighting at Gettysburgh. Van Alstyne, John (I7149)
 
179 INHERITED THOMAS JOSEPH AND MARIE JEANNE AUGUSTINE'S ESTATES WHEN THEYDIED, SO ENDED UP WITH 3/5 OF FATHER'S ESTATE. Renault, Philippe Francois Celestine (I1238)
 
180 INTERMENT AT DUNN VALLEY CEMETERY, ERIE, PA. Reno, David Philip (I3497)
 
181 Jerry Pugh's grandmother and he says "She is the best cookie maker thereever was.". Devore, Lorena Emily (I3631)
 
182 JOSEPH AND GRACIE SOON GOT A DIVORCE. IT IS SAID THAT SHE GOT PREGNANT BYANOTHER MAN WHILE JOE WAS IN THE SERVICE. NONETHELESS, GRACIE NAMED HERBABY JOSEPH MOLINO, JR.
JERRY PUGH GOT THIS INFORMATION FROPM A GIRL DOWN AT WABASH AND SHE SAIDSHE TALKED TO JOE, JR. AND HE SAID THINGS WERE HARD FOR HIM AND HISMOTHER. SHE WORKED AT DELCO AND IT WAS HARD FOR HER TO GET A BABYSITTERAND AFTER SOME THOUGHT, SHE SOON ALLOWED HER SON TO GO THE COUNTRY TOLIVE. IT WAS HIS CHOICE AS WELL AND HE SAID THAT IT ALL WORKED OUT FORTHE BEST. IF HE HAD LIVED MUCH LONGER IN THE CITY, HE WAS SURE TO GO TOTHE STATE PENINTENTARY. I HAVE NO IDEA HOW OLD HE WAS AT THE TIME SHETALKED TO HIM.
JOE, SR., MARRIED AGAIN TO JOSEPHINE LUCH. THEY HAS A SON, DAN. 
Molino, Joseph Sr. (I4070)
 
183 KILLED AS A BOY BY RUNAWAY HORSE. Reno, Jake (I1874)
 
184 KILLED AT 16 OR 21. Reno, Charles (I997)
 
185 KILLED BY INDIANS IN AN EXPEDITION AGAINST THEM AT SANDUSKYTOWN. Reno, Lewis (I1285)
 
186 KILLED IN AN ACCIDENT AT THE WABASH PAPER MILL, WABASH, IN Bray, Hughey (Hughie) (I3783)
 
187 KILLED IN SECOND BATTLE OF BULL RUN. Brown, Simeon Hovey (I1210)
 
188 killed. Brown, William Augustus (I4893)
 
189 Known as Henry in the US.

The Hamburg ship REICHSTAG was built at Glasgow by Alexander Stephen &Sons in 1867, and owned by Robert Miles Sloman (from 1876, Robert M.Sloman & Co). 300 Commerzlasten / 722 tons register, 53,10 x 9,17 x 5,68(length x beam x depth of hold) meters. She was a transient, employedoriginally in the New York trade; in 1870, however, she was moved to theAustralia (Queensland) trade. On 11 August 1877, she sailed fromNewcastle upon Tyne, England, bound for Singapore, but was never heardfrom again. (From the Palmer List of Merchant Vessels online.) 
Wohlgehagen, Heinrich Adolph (I9562)
 
190 KNOWN AS UNCLE LAFE Reno, Gilbert Lafayette (I999)
 
191 KNOWN LOCALLY AS A FINE CABINET MAKER. Satterlee, Fayette (I2874)
 
192 Left Monongahela, Pa. in 1852. He rtaxed single in 1808 and in 1880 wasliving in Parkersburg, W. Va. He had other unnamed children in additionto these 6 listed. Devore, Samuel (I3562)
 
193 LEFT THE MOUTH OF THE BAY FRANCE ON THE "UNION", COMMANDED BY MR. DE LAMAUCALLIERE, FOR LOUISIANA, MAY 28, 1719. Renault, Philippe Francois (I1242)
 
194 Lester Van Alstine's book, pg143 states that Ezekiel Butler, "whose zealfor the cause of American Independence was so great that the Britishoffered a reward for his head, dead or alive. He must have died beforehostilities ceased, for the account goes on to say that he was privatelyburied for fear his body would be disinterred for the sake of the reward." Butler, Ezekiel (I6899)
 
195 LETTER WRITTEN FROM WESTFIELD HOSPITAL, NY FEB 2, 1974:
DEAR FOLKS,
ABUNDANCE TODAY IS HAVING 3/4 OF A SMALL CRACKER LEFT OVER OR RATHERSAVED FROM A FORMER (1200 C A DAY MEAL) TO GO WITH 1/3 OF A GLASS OF SKIMMILK.
I CAN BETTER UNDERSTAND GRANDPA RENO TELL ABOUT THE TIME IN THECIVIL WAR WHEN THEY MARCHED ALL DAY AND RAN ONCE IN A WHILE TO REST THENON GETTING THE CHANCE FOR THOSE WHO HAD NOT DROPPED BY THE WAY THEY LAYDOWN TO SLEEP WITHOUT SUPPER. A MAN RUSHED UP ON HORSE BACK AND SAID THEREBS SHOT THE HORSES ON THE FOOD WAGON AND THEY WERE TO FORM RANKS IN 1HR. AND GO AGAIN. GRANDPA AND A "BILL" SNEAKED OUT WITH 2 SILVERSHILLINGS TO TRY AND BUY SOME FOOD FROM A FARMER, BUT THE FARMER SAID HEHAD NONE, SO GRANDPA TOOK OUT HIS "DIRK KNIFE" AND SAID IF SHILLINGS DONOT TALK "DUTCH" THIS KNIFE WILL.
THE NET RESULTS WERE THE WIFE SHOWED UP WITH ABOUT A PINT OF SMALLPOTATOES AND A LIKE AMOUNT OF SHELLED CORN. THEY GOT BACK TO CAMP FORROLL CALL OK AND HE SAID POTATOES NEVER WERE AS GOOD OR WELL COOKED ASTHE "DUTCH" KIND. AS THE TIRED MEN STUMBLED THRU THE DARK NITE TO MEET ATTHE 2ND BATTLE OF BULL RUN, GRANDPA AND "BILL" ATE A KERNEL AT A TIME ANDGAVE A FEW AWAY. THE WAY TO ENJOY HARD CORN IS "SOAK UNTIL IT MELTS INYOUR MOUTH, THEN SWALLOW SLOWLY ABOUT A KERNEL PER MILE." YEARS LATERWHEN WHEN GRANDMOTHER CUT UP THE OLD ARMY COAT TO MAKE MITTENS FOR JOHNNYAND LOREN FOR CHRISTMAS SHE FOUND 2 KERNELS OF STRIPED CORN WHICH BECAMETHE ANCESTORS OF "QUAIL TRACK", AND RED EARS THAT WERE HUNG BEHIND THESTOVES AT EACH PLACE FOR SEED EACH YEAR, AND MANY A FARMER FOR MILESAROUND CAME TO GET A LITTLE SEED TO START SOME OF OLD MAN RENO'S GOODCORN.
NOW WE BUY CERTIFIED HYBRID AND IT MAY YIELD MORE BUT SURE LACKSCOLOR.
OH, YES, THE 1200 C DIET HAS TAKEN OFF 20# IN THREE WEEKS AND ISSTILL WORKING BUT SLOWING UP; IF ANY ONE NEEDS IT AND WILL USE IT I CANGET IT FOR YOU.
THE TWO DOCTORS AGREE THAT THEY WILL TAKE AT LEAST ONE TWO OFF NEXTTHUR, WHICH WILL REDUCE ME EVEN MORE; I WILL WRITE AND TELL YOU IF IADVISE IT FOR THE REST OF YOU AFTER THEY DO IT; SOME OF YOU NEED TO ADD#, SO IT WOULD NOT BE WORTH TRYING.
LETTER 2/19/1974:
ABOUT SIXTY YEARS AGO I HEARD JOE AND LAFE TALKING OF MANY EVENTS OFTHEIR YOUTH AND AGREEING AS BROTHERS ON THE WHYS AND WHATS OF MANY THINGSABOUT THE OLD RENO TREE THAT STOOD SOLID AND TRUE AS THEY SAY IT, EXCEPTFOR BROTHER SAM WHO HAD WILD AND CRAFTY SONS BUT ALL BECAUSE OF THE, TOTHEM, UNWISE SELECTION OF A WORLDLY AND CRAFTY WIFE; WHICH, HOWEVER, HEENDURED TO THE BITTER END. ONE STORY OF THEIR "PAPPY", A HARDY OLD MANOF FAIR AND JUST DEPORTMENT AND A MAN OF INDUSTRY, WIT, AND GRIT WAS THATEACH FALL HE FELL VICTIM OF THE "RUEMITIZ" WHICH MADE HIM BEND OVER ACANE BY THANKSGIVING AND A CRIPPLE ON CRUTCHES BY NEW YEARS, WHO BARELYEXISTED ON BUCKWHEAT PANCAKES, SAUSAGE, AND FIXINGS TILL PLOWIN' TIME INTHE SPRING, WHEN THEY HELPED HIM TO A WALKING PLOW, WHERE, BAREFOOTED HEDRAGGED ALONG BEHIND THE PLOW WHILE THE BARE COLD FRESH SOIL SEEMED TOSLOWLY PULL THE "RUEMITIZ" OUT OF HIS SYSTEM. ON THE FIRST WAY AROUND ASMALL BEAR CUB ROLLED OUT OF THE BRUSH AND "PAPPY" PICKED IT UP WHERE ITCLUNG TO HIS SHIRT WHIMPERING AND HANGING ON FOR "DEAR LIFE"; MAMA BEARTHEN APPEARED, THE HORSES BOLTED FOR THE BARN AND PAPPY MADE A CLOSE 2NDWITH MAMA BEAR 3RD AND THE BOYS SHOT HER WITH LOADED MUZZLE LOADERS THATMOST BOYS HAD AROUND IN THOSE DAYS, AND JOE, AT LEAST, STILL KEPT WHEN IKNEW HIM FIFTY YEARS LATER.
WHAT WAS THE REAL PROBLEM TO JOE AND LAFE WAS THAT PAPPY NEVER HAD"RUEMITIZ" AGAIN. 
Reno, Norman Iddings (I252)
 
196 lived 22 years with Alonson Gray's family she had 77 grandchildren when she died Rider, Susannah (I9038)
 
197 Lived at Bowridge Hall,, Gillingham, Dorset, England. Greene, Richard (I907)
 
198 LIVED IN JACKSON TWP., EITHER OHIO OR INDIANA Devore, Robert (I3927)
 
199 LOLA AND LAUL TOOK MARIE ELLEN AND ETHEL MAE INTO THEIR HOMES AND RAISEDTHEM. Lewis, Lola May (I3639)
 
200 looks like she own a store with nn kendall in 1880 in Monroe, MI, who looks to be a widower. Marilla (I11882)
 

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