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1  Laforge, Cornelius (I2138)
 
2
ABRAHAM VAN AELSTEYN (christening record)
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/IGI/individual_record.asp?recid=500101263759&lds=1®ion=11®ionfriendly=North+America&frompage=99

06 JUN 1762 Reformed Dutch Church, Kinderhook, Columbia, New York

Parents:
Father: PHILIP VAN AELSTEYN
Mother: MARYA

 
Van Alstyne (VAN AELSTEYN), Abraham Philip (I5632)
 
3 REVOLUTIONARY REMINISCENCES
by Carrie St.John's grandfather Lewis William Thickstun
Pretty Molly Compton spent eight years of her girlhood in the din anddangers of the Revolutionary War. Her father, Jacob Compton, owned theThomas Guest place in Bonhamtown before, during, and after the strugglefor independence. Molly was six years old when the war began, and wasfourteen when it ended. She saw Count Van Donop and his famousHesse-Cassel musketeers march away in the direction of New Brunswick. Shesaw Sir William Howe and his royal army as they undertook to cross overNew Jersey into Pennsylvania. She saw them return a few days later quitecretfallen from a five days' interview they had with General Washingtonand his forces, near Middlebrook. She saw the Hessians falling back toAmboy after their fierce but futile attack on Fort Mercer. The brave menmade a halt in front of her father's house. The road known as the King'sHighway was blocked with footmen, dragoons, baggage wagons, andartillery. In the rear was a moving hospital, followed by a funeralprocession. The ambulance contained dead and seriously wounded soldiers.To pass the jam, and hurry on to the surgeons awaiting their arrival inAmboy, the drivers turned their horses from the road, breaking down thefences and crossing the garden. In passing the house Molly saw thewounded and dying and their blood dripping from the wagons in which theywere riding. Last of all came a hearse, and in it was all that was lefton earth of Count Van Donop. His war horse was led by a groom, and acrossthe saddle was tied and thrown the military boots of the late ambitiousleader.
Count Van Donop was a British hireling, but he was one of Nature'snoblemen for all that. He fell in the glacis of Fort Mercer mortallywounded while leading his men against our intrepid defenders. As he wasabout breathing his last he said: "I fall a victim of my own ambition,and to the avarice of my prince, but full of thankfulness for the goodtreatment I have received from my generous enemy."
Colonel Webster was sent with a regiment of troops from Amboy tostrengthen their lines near Bonhamtown. The Colonel took possession ofthe Jerome Ross house, and quartered his men in the best buildings hecould find in the village and neighborhood. Jesse Compton and family weredriven into their low chamber while the British occupied the groundfloors of the little building.
Soon after taking possession, the troops rolled a barrel of gunpowderinto the cellar for safe keeping. This created much uneasiness in theminds of the citizens of the upper half story, but Colonel Websterordered it so to be, and from his commands there was no appeal.
Later in the year Webster and his men moved to the South and took part inthe battle of Camden under Lord Cornwallis. A Colonel Webster, probablythe one whose headquarters were in the Jerome Ross mansion a portion ofthe year 1779, was killed in the battle of Guilford Court-house, in NorthCarolina, March 15th, 1781.
Molly Compton heard the booming of cannon at the battle of Monmouth onthe 28th of June, 1778. She personally knew Molly Pitcher who took aconspicuous part in the struggle after her husband had been killed by theBritish in the bloody encounter.
One day, while standing at a window of the Thomas Guest house, she saw afine-looking man approaching on the road leading in the direction ofMetuchen. He was superbly mounted on a dapple gray, whose mane and tail,white as the driven snow, were cavorting with the wind. Molly thought shehad never seen such a fine-looking man, such a splendid equestrian. Heturned the corner on the gallop as if going to New Brunswick, but haltedin front of the house, dismounted, and then led his beautiful horse intoa blacksmith shop near at hand. A few minutes were spent in having a shoetightened on the animal, and then, coming out, the man remounted hissteed and was "off to the wars again." It was General Washington.
While making the Jerome Ross house in Bonhamtown his headquarters in1779, the British commander, Col. Webster, did not rest on a bed ofroses. He favored the Tory element, and oppressed those he called rebels.He would pay gold to the Tory and confiscate property belonging to thePatriot, when he needed supplies. Foraging parties were sent out to buyand to plunder. Loyal farmers and dealers could sell and obtain goodprices and good pay, while their neighbors, if Patriots, could seldomsell at any figure, nor were they allowed to retain what they had if theColonel's men wanted it. This engendered such bitter feeling that menoutside of military organizations united in small numbers to oppose whatthey termed the British marauders.
Five men, well mounted, decided to do what they could in this direction.They kept in or near the camp of the American army a portion of the time;but when the exigencies of war encouraged, they made excursions along theBritish lines, or across them, to intercept parties taking supplies tothe enemy. The little band knew every road and lane and driftway in thispart of Middlesex County. These men watched Colonel Webster and histroops and weighed their doings and probable purposes with eagle eyes andthe courage of lions.
The leader of the scouts, Joseph Thickstun, had a sister Mary, livingnear Bonhamtown, who was as bold and patriotic as he. Somehow she knewwhen he and his four comrades would be in the neighborhood. She could notgive them shelter in her home, as Tories would make speedy report toColonel Webster. She did a better thing than that. There was a place notfar away called the Swamp, near the Raritan. The men would leave BoundBrook, or some other place in the vicinity of the American army, in timeto reach the Swamp after dark. Here they were sure to find a basket ofprovisions suitable for the not over fastidious appetite of a hungrysoldier. To reach the spot, the men were obliged to pass the Britishlines near Stelton, Bonhamtown, or Valentine's. They remained in theSwamp until the following evening. Soon after dark they turned out toreconnoitre. One night they came upon a party driving a flock of sheep toBonhamtown. They put the men under guard and drove the sheep to themountains, and then to General Washington's forces, where half starvedvolunteers tickled their palates with mutton, and thanked the scoutsprofoundly between mouthfuls. When the shepherds reported their mishap,and did not know who were their captors nor whence they came nor whitherthey went, there was wrath and profanity in Bonhamtown.
A second excursion with similar results created almost a panic, and plansas well as execreations against the perpetrators filled the minds of theColonel, his aids, and abettors. The "Red Coats" were called dunces andidiots, interlarded with expletives. A Tory came into town and believedthat Mary Thickstun knew more about the raids than ought to be known by aloyal subject of King Goerge. Proof was so strong against her that theColonel thought it might be well to have her watched. Accordingly he senta Scotch sergeant with six men under orders to shoot her if seen six rodsfrom her house after dark. Her brother William, who lived on a farm, nowknown as the Mumford-Wilson place, and his family talked the matter overat the breakfast table. A lad of fourteen years listened intently, andbefore finishing the morning meal, had decided what to do. His name wasLewis. He was William's oldest son. He was proud of such an auntie, andshe doted on him. He did the chores at the barn, feeding forty-five headof cattle, ninety fat sheep, a span of horses, pigs, turkeys, ducks,geese, pigeons, chickens, all that an industrous and prosperous farmerusually had in that day, and then started in quest of his uncle Joseph.He took an out-of-the-way lane, and crossed the British lines without achallenge. Before night he found his uncle in the American camp, nicelylocated between spurs of the Watchhung Mountains. He lost no time intelling his story.
In half an hour the five scouts were in their saddles. They were afterlarger game, this time, than sheep. Before morning they were in theSwamp, near the Raritan. They found no basket of provisions this time onthe well-known stump. Mary knew that she was under guard, and didn't knowthat her brother and his friends were risking their lives to save hers.The hours dragged slowly along. Finally night came with her friendlymantle to hide them from their dangerous foes. Emerging from their saferetreat, they called on Mary, who told them in whispers that the Scotchsergeant and his armed men were in the little building not ten rods away.Thither they crept. The Scotchman and his squad were not so watchful asthey might have been. They were playing "seven up," and deeply absorbedin the game. Each won a booby prize. There was no way of egress but bytwo windows and a door. One scout was to stand at each window, and threeat the door, to prevent escape. To break open the door was to be thebeginning of the attack, and the first blow was the signal for the men atthe windows to smash them in and demand surrender.
The door held a few moments, but the windows yielded at once. Six of theseven astonished inmates gave up their guns at once, but the Sergeantshowed fight. He was cocking his musket to fire as Joseph gained the opendoorway, and in a moment more would have fixed him. Joseph, although aman not thirsting for gore, was too quick for him. He blazed away withouttaking much aim and shot off the Sergeant's right index finger. This puta sudden end of the attempt to cock his gun, and he too surrendered. Eachside took a good look at the other. Seven unarmed men, if they were proudBritons, were no match for five determined and doubly armed Yankees.
"Walk out!" said Joseph. "Form in line! Halt!"
The new commander's orders were promptly obeyed. The scouts vaultedhurriedly into their saddles, and "Forward, march!" greeted the ears ofthe discomfited seven.
Joseph did not wish to disturb the slumbers of the Colonel and his men,scarcely half a mile distant. He was thinking of his own safety, andself-preservation only, induced him to discharge his carbine when theScotchman was making haste to kill him. As it was, pickets heard thereport and guns were soon popping all along the "King's Highway" in bothdirections from Colonel Webster's headquarters. Men were soon rushinghither and thither, officers were calling, fifes were screaming, drumswere pounded. Molly Compton heard the din. Her eyes were wide open. Shewas soon at the window. She said she had never before heard such a hubbubat Bonhamtown. It seemed more like a riot than the proceedings of membersof a disciplined army. They knew the scouts were out again, and glory orshame would be theirs on the morrow.
Of course the troopers were in a hurry, but the Scotchman and his menwere not. The Sergeant was corpulent, and to make the required time, wasobliged to trot now and then on his night parade. He found room, however,to put in some bristling interjections about the "damned rebels." Justthen, sometimes, he would feel a prick of his lately surrendered bayonetin some tender spot in the rear, and would conclude that discretion wasmore useful if not so ornamental as profanity, and would trot on. Theline of march was probably by way of Piscatawaytown, New Durham and so onto the American army in the vicinity of Bound Brook. At any rate, thescouts escaped unharmed from the many dangers which hovered closelyaround them from the moment of the capture to their arrival in thevicinity of the mountains.
General Washington received the scouts with thanks, and took care oftheir crest-fallen footmen. The gallant Englishmen detailed by a Britishofficer and led by a Scotchman to shoot an amiable woman, armed with abasket of provisions for her brother, were taken to New York andexchanged for seven American soldiers in the Sugar House there.
After the encounter with the Scotchman and his disgruntled comrades,Joseph Thickstun and his associated remained near the American army,helping wherever and whenever they could be useful. His brave youngnephew, Lewis, knew better than to return to his home and be hung by theBritish as a spy. He was too young to carry a musket and endure thehardships of a trained militiaman, but he clung to the army, acting as acourier, and doing all he could in its interest until it was disbandedwith the benedictions of the entire nation in 1783.
The whole story of the raid was soon known to Colonel Webster, and asmall force was sent to arrest and take William Thickstun before thataustere officer. He was charged with the grave crime of being a fatherof a degenerate son, a crime so common that it sometimes, in theestimation of army officers, ceases to be a sin. The accused knew nothingabout the plans of his brave boy before they developed into action.
William had no part in the undertaking which led to the capture of theScotchman and his men. This so appeared at the trial, and the Colonel lethim off with the warning that he must expect to pay for the luxury ofbeing the father of a reprobate.
A day or so later Webster sent men to view the farm. They were clothedwith military authority to confiscate the forty-five head of cattle,ninety sheep, span of horses, pigs, turkeys, ducks, geese, pigeons,chickens, and every moving thing which belonged to the unfortunateWilliam Thickstun, for the use and behoof of the British stationed atBonhamtown, Perth Amboy, and New Brunswick. Did they take them? Well,yes, every hoof, wisp of wool, bristle, wing, and feather. It was a bighaul, but was too small for the greedy British. Soon afterward, redcoatswere quartered in the kitchen, dining room, parlors, and bedrooms. DirtyHessians crawled into spare beds, too lazy or too boozy to pull off theirarmy shoes. Cockneys, fresh from London, turned into effinate cooks,wined and dined on oysters and viands from the pantry and cellar. Theyburned down the orchard and cut up posts and rails which had served asfences. All the small outbuildings were torn down and used as kindlingwood. The place which had blossomed as a rose was as desolate as thescouts' camp in the swamp.
When Lewis returned from the war in April, 1783, he found none of hisbarnyard pets where he left them one morning in 1779, but he was notupbraided. He was honored and beloved by all good citizens who knew him.His father saw him while yet a great way off and ran and met him. Therewas no fatted calf, or even duck or chicken to kill, but the faithful ladwas most welcome. His aunt shook him and hugged him and kissed him. Bestof all, if possible, Molly Compton received him with open arms.(continued on Lewis Wm. Thickstun's notes)

buried in "the East Orchard" Mosiertown, Pa. and monument in CarmelCemetary. 
Compton, Mary (Molly) (I1010)
 
4 MY GIFT
I PARTED TODAY WITH A BEAUTIFUL BOWL,
A BEAUTIFUL DEEP BLUE BOWL.
IT'S LIGHTS AND IT'S COLORS SPOKE TO MY HEART
AS THOUGH IT HAD A SOUL.

'TWAS A FANCIFUL THING - THOUGH VERY PLAIN GLASS
TO ONE WITH A COLORLESS MIND,
BUT I LOVED THE BLUE BOWL, AND HATED TO PART
WITH WHAT I CONSIDERED "A FIND".

LIFE FOR ME IS RICH WITH LAUGHTER AND LOVE
SO I SENT THE BOWL TO A FRIEND.
FOR THE KIND OF THINGS THAT I LIKE TO KEEP
ARE THE KIND THAT I LIKE TO SEND.

MRS. CAROLYN ST.JOHN
25 ORCHARD ST.
CANAJOHARIE, NY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Following written 1/8/1941 by Carrie St.John:
AS WE FORGIVE
Trudge, tridge, trudge. Weary and sore are the backs and feet. Weary frommany days of trudging. And what an incredibly short distance one steptakes a person when toes are sticking through the shoes and when musclesare tired and backs breaking from long hours on the road and short hoursof sleeping on the damp ground without cover.

Dozens of feet- - - hundreds of feet- - - thousands of feet. All goingback.

Back to what? No one seems to know. That is, no one but the big bombersthat droned overhead with their heavy loads, and the quick littlefighting planes that darted around like dragon flies clearing the way forthe bombers. They knew - - - but didn't care.

Once this country was HOME with open fields planted by their own hands.HOME, with cottages paid for with much toil and much living. HOME, with alight in the window at night. HOME, a place of deep content and rest fromcare. Humble but sufficient.

So back they come, too weary to remember - - only strong enough to dragthose heavy feet - and feet shouldn't be heavy for Jon and Margot. Theyare five and seven- - and alone! No one knows where home is, no one knowswhere Mother is, no one seems to know or care where anything is. Theyjust trudge, trudge, trudge. Strangers all around, who like themselvesare too tired to think or feel. All going the same way because there isno other way to go.

Silence of many hours is broken by Margo's voice. . . she is older. . .just seven. "This was our town. Our house should be there"., Only alittle more dragging of those heavy feet and they are by the ruin thatwas once HOME.

No words between. No words to describe them. Just two folorn [sic] raggedforms standing by a pile of debris, feeling things that we have neverfelt. As if with common desire they knelt and started the prayer our Lordtaught so long ago:
Our Father which art in Heaven
Hallowed be Thy name.
Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done
On earth as it is in Heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread
And forgive us our trespasses - - - the little voices halted andcould not go on. Again they said the prayer but could not finish- - -thinking of the trespasses of the invader.

Behind them a deep trembling voice went on- - - "And forgive us ourtrespasses as we forgive those that trespass against us" And thechildren whispered "Amen".

They never knew that the king of their country stood behind them thatday- - - an exile, homeless and in disguise, but with a heart big andtrue: full of pity and love for his own, full of pity and love for thefoe.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Obituary: Portland, TN.
A service will be held for Mrs. Carrie Reno St.John, 87, of Highway 31West, formerly of Canajoharie and Palatine Bridge, NY, who died Wednesdayat Highland Hospital.
Born and educated in Edinboro, Pa., Mrs. St.John was a graduate of theformer Edinboro Normal School with a bachelor's degree. She later was agraduate of the Library School of the former Geneseo Normal School of NewYork with a master's degree in library science.
She lived in the Canajoharie and Palatine Bridge area for more than 40years.
Mrs. St.John was a librarian for the Canajoharie Library and Art Galleryfrom 1926 to 1930.
She was a former member of the Ames Baptist Church and a current memberof the Bethel Baptist Church in Jamestown, N.Y.
Her husband, Donald St.John, whom she married March 31, 1929, died in1986.
Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Cora Helen Mazanec of Portland andMrs. Mary Alice Merritt of Lutz, Fla.; three sons, Martin St.John ofSchenectady, Leslie St.John of Arlington, Texas, and Richard St.John ofCulpepper, Va.; a sister, Cora Reno of Scottsdale, Ariz.; 27grandchildren; and 26 great-grandchildren.
The service will be 2 p.m. Saturday in the chapel of the Houghtaling &Smith Funeral Home, 20 Otsego St., Canajoharie.
Burial will be in Canajoharie Falls Cemetery.
A calling hour will precede the service at the chapel.
Memorial contributions may be made to Cornerstone Baptist Church, P.O.Box 703, Route 10, Ames, N.Y. 13317. 
Reno, Carrie Thickstun (I303)
 
5 BORN IN HOLLAND, EMIGRATED TO THE U.S. IN 1665 AND 22 YEARS LATER ISMENTIONED WITH MANY OTHERS WHO TOOK THE OATH OF ALLEGIANCE IN KINGSCOUNTY, NEW YORK. ABOUT 1684 HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF A TRACT OF LANDLYING ON THE EAST SIDE OF KINDERHOOK CREEK AND ADJOINING THE LANDS OF HISFATHER, JAN MARTENSE, BY PURCHASE OF THE PATENT FROM THE HEIRS OF PETERVAN ALEN. THIS LAND HE HELD UNTIL HIS DEATH. ALL OF HIS CHILDREN EXCEPTTHE FIRST BORN WAS BAPTIZED IN KINDERHOOK.
JANNETJE MINGAEL AND HER HUSBAND WERE FIRST COUSINS, ONCE REMOVED,HER FATHER AND HER HUSBAND BEING FIRST COUSINS. 
Van Alstyne (van Aelsteyn), Lambert Janse (I2050)
 
6 Civil War Record:
Pvt. William A. Van Alstyne - Com. Officer, Capt. O.S. Sheldon Co. B.,16th Brig. TST - Drafted August 7, 1863 for six months under order ofGovernor. Capt. Thomas Martin, Co. B. 1st Reg. TST Col. T.J.M. RichardsonComdg. Co. Discharged March 16, 1864 at Camp Lubbock.
William Ashley Van Alstyne was a director and principal stockholder ofthe Houston and Texas Central Railroad. There is a railroad station andtown named Van Alstyne, forty miles north of Dallas, TX. named for hiswife, Maria.

An official Texas historical marker was placed (1994) at 103 W. Main inVan Alstyne noting its origin as an outcome of the placement of therailroad and the origin of its name.

following per Lester Van Alstine book, pages 111-112:

The city of Van Alstyne, Texas lies fifty miles north of Dallas, onHighway 75 in the southern part of Grayson County.
William Ashley Van Alstyne, son of John Van Alstyne and PollyAshley, was born January 29, 1816 in the state of New York. When he wastwenty-three years of age, he went to Texas and filed for a land grant in1839 for 320 acres of land in Galveston County. He received the grantNovember 5, 1841.
He was the treasurer, director aand principal stockholder of theTexas Central Railroad. His holdings in Texas in 1860 were valued at$50,000.00 and his personal property was valued at $25,000.00, which wasa considerable sum for that time.
In earlier years the Texas Central Railroad was built from Houstonto Dallas. In 1872 they completed the railroad from Dallas to Dennison,Texas and then built a spur into Van Alstyne, Texas, and the first trainpulled into Van Alstyne, Texas on March 12, 1873; and a new town was born.
The reason the town was named Van Alstyne was because William AshleyVan Alstyne died in 1867 before the railroad was completed, so they namedthe town "Maria Van Alstyne" in memory of William Van Alstyne, who washis wife. Maria was never used and the town was called Van Alstyne. Thetwo smaller towns south of Van Alstyne are named for his two daughters,Anna and Melissa.
Van Alstyne was originally part of the Sister Grove Precinct settledin 1840 and grew partially out of old Mantua settlement, which waslocated three miles southwest of the present city of Van Alstyne.
Younger Scott Mckinney laid out Mantua in 1853; by 1857 a MasonicCharter was received and a lodge built. The town had one of the brighterfutures for growth, but was soon to perish and completely vanish.
A city had died and the new railroad had given birth to a new one. Agroup of citizens from Mantua saw the potential the railroad wouldprovide by transporting farm products to markets, and bringing suppliesback by rail, so they purchased land from Ashley McKinney, and laid outthe town.
In other history of the town, Dr. James LaFayette, Leslie Riddle andOscar Riddle opened a store and by 1885 two grist mills, a flour millwere in operation and the population had risen to 400. By 1890 it hadreached 800 and Mr. Joseph Greer had started publishing the Van AlstyneNews. Columbia College was established by H.L. Piner in 1889. The townhad two banks, a grain elevator, a roller mill and a chemical company. By1900 the population had reached 1940. In 1971 the population was 2268.Mantua was long gone and the only city on the North American Continent tobear the name Van Alstyne was established. Today the city stands on thethreshold of a tremendous future growth and development.
The above history was researched and compiled by Mr. & Mrs. LesterVan Alstine of Salem, Wisconsin, February 4, 1971. 
Van Alstyne, William Ashley (I5513)
 
7 Names
Patentee: LAWRENCE VAN ALSTYNE

Survey
State: MICHIGAN
Acres: 80
Metes/Bounds: No

Title Transfer
Issue Date: 4/4/1833
Land Office: Detroit
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)

Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 4804
Accession/Serial Nr.: MI0100__.337
BLM Serial Nr.: MI NO S/N



 
Van Alstyne, Laurence (I9018)
 
8 "Lambert Janse Van Alstyne and some of his Descendants" Author: Van Alstyne, Lawrence 1897
Available on CD from QuintinPublications.com 
Van Alstyne, Lawrence (I7177)
 
9 "MY GRANDFATHER (JOSEPH IDDINGS RENO) WENT WEST IN COVERED WAGON DAYSWHEN FATHER WAS ONLY A FEW MONTHS OLD. HE CAMPED NEARBY THE NIGHT OF THEBATTLE OF THE LITTLE BIG H0RN (1876), AND WHEN THEY RECEIVED WORD OF WHATHAD HAPPENED, GRANDMOTHER SAID, 'IF THE U.S. ARMY CAN'T PROTECT ITSELF,THIS IS NO PLACE FOR US. LET'S GO HOME!'. HE HAD PURCHASED LAND WHERELINCOLN, NEBRASKA, NOW STANDS, BUT SOLD IT TOO SOON. HE WAS ONE OFBUFFALO BILL'S SCOUTS WHO HUNTED MEAT FOR THE CREWS WHO WERE BUILDING THEUNION PACIFIC R.R., AND MET HIM MANY YEARS LATER WHEN BUFFALO BILL WAS ONCIRCUS TOUR. HE HAD TAKEN MY BROTHER NORMAN TO MEET HIM, AND 'BB' SAID,'WELL, JOE RENO, IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME!'
"GRANDFATHER TOLD MANY STORIES OF HIS DAYS IN THE WEST, AND A FEWYEARS AGO WE SIX CHILDREN GOT TOGETHER AND RECORDED ON TAPE ALL WE COULDREMEMBER OF THOSE TALES. HE STRETCHED THE TRUTH AND GOT SOME CIVIL WAREXPERIENCES ALSO, AS HE MUSTERED OUT AT THE AGE OF 18 (served 2 yrs inUnion artillery). WE HAVE HIS PENCIL-WRITTEN DIARY OF THOSE DAYS...(nowin hands of Richard St.John, Culpeper, VA.) GIVEN TO OUR OLDEST SON,RICHARD, WHO WAS THE NEXT ONE IN THE FAMILY TO SERVE IN THE ARMEDFORCES...
"ONE DAY, EARLY IN 1889, GRANDFATHER CAME IN FROM CHORES AND SAIDSOMETHING TO THIS EFFECT: 'CARRIE, THROW SOMETHING INTO THE WAGON, ANDWE'LL GO SEE THE OPENING OF THE OKLAHOMA TERRITORY! NEIGHBORS WILL TAKECARE OF THE COWS HERE.', AND SO IT WAS THAT THEY LEFT THE BREAKFASTDISHES ON THE TABLE, SHUT THE FRONT DOOR WITHOUT LOCKING IT, AND WENT FORTHE 'OPENING'. LATER THEY CAME HOME AND WASHED THE DISHES! WHAT ANADVENTURE FOR A 14 YEAR OLD BOY AND HIS SIBLINGS!"(told by Carrie RenoSt.John)
MRS. ST.JOHN ALSO TELLS AN INTERESTING STORY ABOUT THE HORSE WHICH RANAWAY WITH JAKE RENO, KILLING HIM. THE REST OF THE FAMILY WANTED TO SHOOT"OLD PRINCE" FOR THIS DEED, BUT JOSEPH IDDINGS INSISTED THE HORSE WAS NOTTO BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE. HE DROVE HIM WEST ON THE OLD COVERED WAGON TRIPREFERRED TO ABOVE. OLD PRINCE BROKE A LEG SOMEWHERE IN THE MIDWEST ANDAGAIN, JOSEPH IDDINGS SAVED HIM FROM BEING SHOT. PRINCE WAS TURNEDLOOSE, RECOVERED AND WAS PICKED UP ON THE RETURN TRIP TO PENNSYLVANIA.
CIVIL WAR DIARY:
THURS. SEP 1, 1864 - WALKED TO NEW CASTLE BEFORE DAYLIGHT. TOOK THETRAIN AT 5:00. REACHED N.B. BY SUNUP. ATE BREAKFAST AT 7:00. DINED AT1:00 AND PREPARED TO TAKE TRAIN FOR PALESTINE AT QUARTER OF 4:00 BUT WEREDETAINED BY AN ACCIDENT FOR THREE QUARTERS OF AN HOUR IN WHICH TIME IFELL IN WITH A SINGING TEACHER, MR. CHARLES S. THE CAR WE WERE IN WOULDSTRIKE THE TIES AND BOUNCE TILL EVERYTHING WOULD JINGLE. WE REACHEDPALESTINE AT 6:00. ATE OUR SUPPER AND STARTED FOR THE SINGING WHICH WEREACHED AT ABOUT QUARTER OF 8:00.
FRI. SEP 2 - LEFT THE CITY OF AT ABOUT HALF PAST 7. REACHED PAL 9. TOOKTHE TRAIN AT NINE AND 1/2 AND REACHED N.B. ABOUT NOON. THEN I RUN AROUNDTILL ABOUT GRUB TIME WHEN I WENT TO THE GARD HOUSE GOT MY SUPPER AND RUNAROUND TILL NIGHT. THERE WAS A FELLOW BROT A BOTTLE TO OUR QUARTERS ANDIT WAS STRANGE TO SEE HOW CUTE THEY PASSED IT ROUND. WE HAD A HARD BEDBUT LOTS OF FUN.
SAT MORNING, SEP 3 - I HAVE HAD MY BREAKFAST AND AM ALRIGHT. I TOOK AFRENCH TWICE AND WAS ALL OVER TOWN BUT THEY FOUND ME OUT AND I WENT BACK.I TOOK THE TRAIN AT 2 AND GOT TO PITTS AT ABOUT 4. THEN WE WERE STUFFEDIN AN OLD ROOM AS TIGHT AS WE COULD STAND FOR ABOUT AN HOUR AND A HALF.SOME OF THE FELLOWS MASHED OUT THE WINDOWS. WE LEFT FOR CAMP ABOUT DARKWHICH WE REACHED AFTER A WET RIDE AND A SLIPPY WALK ABOUT 9 OCL THEN WEHAD TO STAND ROUND IN THE RAIN ABOUT AN HOUR AT LAST THEY MARCHED US INTHE EATING QUARTERS WHERE I ENJOYED A PLEASANT SLEEP.
SEP 4TH - WE GOT OUR BREAKFAST THIS MORNING ABOUT 8:00 WHICH CONSISTED OFONE CRACKER AND A PIECE OF PORK. WE GOT OUR DINNER AND SUPPER ABOUT 2 ITIS STILL RAINING AND IT IS PRETTY WINDY.
SEP 5TH - NOTHING OF MUCH NOTE TRANSPIRED BUT IT RAINED ALL DAY BY SPURTS.
TUES MORNING SEP 6TH - WE WERE ORGANIZED THIS MORNING BEFORE BREAKFAST.WE HAD SOMETHING OVER A FULL COMPANY. SEP 6TH THIS EVENING I SAW THE SUNFOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE I CAME TO CAMP.
SEP 10TH-64 - THERE HAS BEEN NOTHING TRANSPIRED OF ANY ACCOUNT SINCE THE6TH AND NOT MUCH THEN. THIS MORNING WE WENT OUT TO REORGANIZE AND SOME OFOUR FELLOWS WERE ABSENT SO WE HAD TO GO BACK. TODAY I DREW BREAD THREETIMES WHICH MADE ME A MEAL AND A HALF IF I DID NOT PLAY THEM A SLIP IWOULD NOT GET HALF ENOUGH. SAT EVENING SEP 10 - THIS EVENING WE GOT THENEWS THAT WE WERE THREW OUT OF COL GALLOPS REGT BUT THEY SAY THAT WE WILLGET INTO COL RAMSES REGT WHICH WILL SUIT US JUST AS WELL IF WE ONLY GOTINTO IT.
TUES EVE SEP 13 - TODAY WE WERE MARCHED OUT AND ORGANIZED INTO A REGT.THIS AFTERNOON COL GALLOPS REGT MARCHED DOWN TO THE RAILROAD AND LAIDTHERE TILL ABOUT SUNDOWN. TWO CARLOADS HAVE GONE AND THE 3RD CAR ISLOADING. WHEN IT GETS STARTED IT WILL MAKE ABOUT 16 OR 17 HUNDRED MEN.THE BAND CONSISTS OF 14 BUGLERS ONE SNARE ONE BRASS DRUM AND ONE WITHBRASS PLATES WHICH MADE A GOOD BIT OF NOISE.
THURS 15TH - WE DREW OUR RATIONS TODAY AND MARCHED DOWN TO THE CARS ABOUT4:00 A.M. AND LAYD DOWN THERE TILL DARK. WE WERE PUT INTO A FREIGHT TRAINAT LAST WE GOT STARTED. PRESENTLY WE LAID DOWN AND SLEPT PRETTY WELL.WHEN WE WAKED UP WE WERE ABOUT 100 MILES FROM HARRISBURGH YET WHEN WE GOTWITHIN A FEW MI OF HARRIS WE TOOK A CROSS OUT FOR BALTIMORE.
SAT 17TH - THIS MORNING WHEN WE WAKED UP WE WERE IN THE EDGE OFBALTIMORE. WE PACKED UP AND MARCHED A MILE OR TWO INTO THE TOWN. LAIDROUND A WHILE AND THEN GOT OUR BREAKFAST. THERE WERE PLENTY OF PRETTYGIRLS IN LITTLE YORK BUT I COULD SEE NOTHING BUT DARKIES IN BALTIMORE. WELEFT BALTIMORE ABOUT NOON AND REACHED WASHINGTON AT SUNSET. WE GOT SUPPERABOUT 9 AFTER LAYING ROUND FOR ABOUT 2 HRS.
WASHINGTON SEP 18TH - THIS CITY AS WELL AS BALTIMORE IS FULL OF NEGROES.I HEARD A SERMON THIS MORNING FROM A SOUND ABOLITIONIST. A REGT HAS JUSTARRIVED WHO HAVE BEEN IN THE FIELD FOR 3 YEARS. THERE IS LEFT ONLY 140MEN OF THE WHOLE REGT. THIS EVENING WE DREW OUR ARMS ABOUT DUSK AND DIDNOT GET THROUGH AND SUPPER OVER TILL ABOUT 9 OR 10. THIS MORNING WE DREW40 ROUND OF AMMUNITION AND STARTED ABOUT 8 OR 9 AND REACHED THIS CAMPABOUT 2 AFTER A VERY DUSTY MARCH. THIS IS A VERY NICE PLACE. WE ARE NOTIN THE FORT YET.
FORT MARCY SEP 20TH - LAST NIGHT WE DREW OUR RATIONS ABOUT SUNDOWN WHICHWERE FULL OF BUGS AND WORMS. WE THEN LAID DOWN TO SLEEP WITH GROUND FOROUR FLOOR AND THE SKY FOR OUR ROOF AND GOT UP THIS MORNING FEELING VERYWELL AFTER A GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP. WE HAD COMPANY DRILL TODAY FOR THE FIRSTTIME.
SEP 21 - TODAY WE LEFT FORT MARCY AND CAME TO CHAIN BRIDGE. THIS IS ALSOA NICE PLACE BUT SICKLY.
CHAINBRIDGE SEP 24TH - THIS MORNING I WENT ON GUARD FOR THE FIRST TIME.IT WENT PRETTY WELL. I GOT MY FIRST LETTER FROM HOME TODAY.
SUNDAY MORNING 25TH - IT HAS BEEN VERY WINDY DURING THE NIGHT. IT STILLBLOWS PRETTY BRISK. LAST NIGHT IT CAME PRETTY NEAR BLOWING ME OFF THEFORT. WE DREW OUR CLOTHES BUT THEY ARE NOT DISTRIBUTED YET.
WEDNESDAY SEP 28 - FORT. THIS EVENING WE RECEIVED MARCHING ORDERS SO WEHAD TO PACK UP OUR KNAPSACKS. 9 O'CLOCK CAME AND WE WENT TO BED.
THURSDAY MORNING - I WENT ON GUARD AND WAS RELIEVED ABOUT 3 IN THEAFTERNOON. I WENT TO THE BARRACKS PACKED UP AGAIN ATE MY SUPPER ANDSTARTED FOR FORT ETHAN ALLEN ABOUT 4. WE WENT ABOUT A MILE PAST AND SATDOWN TILL DARK. WE THEN STARTED AND MARCHED TILL 10 WHEN WE HALTED ANDPUT UP FOR THE NIGHT. IT RAINED ENOUGH TO WET THE BLANKETS SO AS TO MAKETHEM HEAVY. I LENT BOTH MY COATS WHICH MADE MY LOAD PRETTY LIGHT.
FRI SEP 30TH - THIS MORNING WE HAD OUR BREAKFAST (ABOUT HALF RATIONS) ANDWERE ON THE MARCH BY SUNUP. WE REACHED ALEXANDER ABOUT 10 OR 11 AND WEREMARCHED INTO THE CARS TO START AND DID NOT KNOW WHEN. WE SOON STARTED ANDWENT PRETTY FAST. WE WENT ABOUT 20 MILES AND STOPPED. WE LAID THERE ANHOUR OR TWO AND THEN CAME ABOUT 5 MILES BACK WHERE WE NOW ARE. WE FOUNDIT A PRETTY HARD LOOKING PLACE. IT IS NOW ABOUT SIX AND WE HAVE HAD NODINNER YET.
OCT 1ST - THIS MORNING WE FIXED UP OUR CABINS. WE HAD NOT MORE THAN GOTTHEM UP WHEN IT COMMENCED RAINING AND KEPT IT UP ALL DAY AND NIGHT.
SUN MORNING 2ND - IT HAS QUIT RAINING AND I HAVE TO GO ON GUARD. LASTNITE ONE OF THE GUARDS GOT SCARED AND RUN IN FOR NOTHING. THERE WAS TWOREGTS OF CALVARY PASSED YESTERDAY. THEY ALL HAD PRETTY GOOD HORSES.
MONDAY MORNING - LAST NIGHT WHEN I WAS ON GUARD I HEARD SIGNAL SOUNDSWHETHER THEY WERE REBS OR NOT I DO NOT KNOW.
OCT 4TH - LAST NITE ONE OF OUR PICKETS GOT SCARED AND RUN IN WHICH MADE AGOOD DEAL OF SPORT AT HIS EXPENSE. WE CUT A CHESTNUT TREE TODAY AND HADALL THE NUTS WE WANTED.
OCT 5TH - LAST NITE I COULD HEAR THE GUNS DOWN AT WHITE PLAINS WHERE THEREBS ATTACKED OUR TRAINS. THEY HAD SOME SKIRMISHING THERE WAS NOT MUCHBLOOD SPILT YOU MAY BET.
OCT 10 - THERE IS A PRETTY BRISK FROST THIS MORNING. THE GROUND IS FROZ ALITTLE.
SAT OCT 15TH-62 - I HAVE BEEN ON DUTY EVERY DAY THIS WEEK. LAST TUESDAY 3OF OUR MEN WERE SHOT BY GUERILLAS WHICH MADE A LITTLE STIR. LAST NIGHT IWENT TO HEADQUARTERS AND WHEN I CAME BACK THEY WERE WAITING FOR AN ATTACKBUT THERE WAS NONE. I STOOD 7 HOURS WITHOUT INTERMITION.
OCT 18TH - YESTERDAY THE NEWS CAME THAT THERE WAS 200 CAVALRY ON HAND SOWE GOT OUT AND LAYED BEHIND THE BRESTWORKS 2 OR 3 HOURS. THEN WE GOT OURSUPPER AND THOUGHT TO HAVE SOME SLEEP. WE JUST GOT AT IT WHEN WE HAD THEORDERS TO FALL IN WHICH WE DID MIDLING WELL. WE WENT BUT DID NOT SEE ANYTHING. WE WERE CALLED OUT TWICE MORE WHICH I DIDN'T LIKE.
NOV 1ST - TWO REBS WERE BROUGHT IN WHICH TOOK A GOOD GAME OF BALL WITH US.
NOV 3RD - RECEIVED $5 00 (NO DECIMAL POINT SHOWN BUT SPACE ALLOWED)
NOV. 8TH - LAST NIGHT WE WERE CALLED OUT AT NINE AND MARCHED A MILE ANDSTOPPED TILL 1 OR 2 AT NIGHT. THEN WE STARTED AND MARCHED TILL SUNUPWHERE WE HALTED ATE OUR GRUB AND STARTED TO CAMP WHICH WE REACHED ATNOON. WITH(OUT) SEEING A REB.
NOV.13TH - I WAS ON GUARD TODAY AND WAS RELIEVED ABOUT TEN O'CLOCK ATNIGHT AND STARTED TO ALEXANDRIA. WE REACHED THERE AND GOT OUR SUPPERABOUT 12 AND 1/2 P.M. WE LAID IN THE STREETS THAT NIGHT. THE NEXT MORNINGWE GOT OUR BREAKFAST BEFORE SUNUP. WE STARTED FOR HERE AT 10 AM AND GOTWITHIN TWO MILES OF THE PLACE WHEN WE LAID DOWN IN THE WOODS FOR THENIGHT WITHOUT ANY DINNER OR SUPPER. WE GOT UP AND STARTED IN THE MORNINGABOUT DAYLIGHT AND GOT HERE ABOUT 8 O'CLOCK. WE GOT NOTHING TO EAT UNTIL5 O'CLOCK THAT NIGHT WHICH MADE US SHORT FOUR MEALS, BUT WE HAVE GOT SOMENOW AND IT IS ALL RIGHT.
NOV. - SPITTING SNOW
DEC. - ABOUT THE FIRST COMMENCED DRILLING ON OUR BIG GUNS.
DEC. 10 - 4 INCHES OF SNOW.
DEC 31, 1864 - MUSTERED FOR PAY FOR THE 3RD TIME. 148 MEN AND ONLY 75PRIVATES FOR DUTY.
JAN.1, 1865 - PRETTY COOL AND NOTHING GOING ON.
JAN.9 - INSPECTION BY GEN. DURUSSY.
FEB.22-65 - INSPECTION AT FT. ETHAN ALLEN AT 10 O'CLOCK. ABOUT 4 INCHESOF MUD WHICH MADE NICE MARCHING. WE WENT BACK AT 2 IN THE AFTERNOON ANDHAD GENERAL WASHINGTON'S FAREWELL ADDRES READ TO US AFTER WHICH WE HAD ASPEACH FROM COL. JORDEN WHICH WAS GRAND AND TO WIND UP WITH THERE WASABOUT A DOZEN OF OUR FELLOWS TIGHT AND WE HAD GRAND TIMES. WE HAD SOMESONGS FROM A VERMONTER WHICH CAUSED A GOOT BIT OF FUN. IT WAS AS PLEASANTAN AFTERNOON AS I HAVE SPENT FOR SOME TIME.
MAR.3TH - WE SIGNED THE PAYROLLS TODAY.
MAR.4TH 1865 - OLD ABE TOOK HIS SEAT TODAY AND A STAR WAS SEEN WHICH THEYCALLED THE STAR OF PEACE. GREAT EXCITEMENT ABOUT A REBEL RAID. ORDERS TOBE UP AT 3 IN THE MORNING (ON THE MORNING OF THE 5TH) AND THIS CHILD SICKAND HAD BEEN FOR 3 OR 4 DAYS. SYMPTOMS OF TYPHOID FEVER.
MAR.5TH - WE WERE CALLED OUT THIS MORNING AT 3 O'CLOCK AND FORMED INTODETACHMENTS BEHIND THE CANNONS TO AWAIT THEIR COMING TILL MORNING. I WASNOT WELL SO I SLIPPED OFF AND WENT TO THE FIRE. MORNING CAME AND NO REBSIN SIGHT YET (POOR SIGHT FOR THEM. SO I LAID DOWN AND SLEPT TILL AFTERINSPECTION.
MAR.6TH - WE GOT OUR GREEN BACKS THIS EVENING AND MUCH DRINKING. INSIDEOF 24 HOURS THERE WAS MORE THAN A DOZEN IN THE GUARDHOUSE SOME CARRYINGLOGS AND ONE TIED UP TO THE BRIDGE.
MARCH 8 - THERE IS ONE IN THE GUARDHOUSE YET. WE HAD ARTILLERY INSPECTIONTODAY BY WILHELM. THE FROGS HAVE COMMENCED HOLLERING ALREADY.
MARCH 16TH - INSPECTION OF KNAPSACKS KANTEENS HAVERSACKS GUNS AND TRAPSAND QUARTERS.
MARCH 23RD - THUNDER AND RAIN.
APRIL 3, 1865 - THE NEWS CAME TODAY THAT RICHMOND WAS OURS WHICH WASRECEIVED WITH THE GREATEST ENTHUSIASM. A SALUTE OF ONE HUNDRED GUNS WEREFIRED FROM ALL THE FORTS AROUND WASHINGTON WHICH WAS A GRAND SPECTACLE.GOLD FELL TO 8 CTS IMMEDIATELY.
APRIL 10TH - LEE SURRENDERED YESTERDAY AND THEY COMMENCED CANNONADINGTHIS MORNING AT 4 1/2 A.M. THIS MORNING PAPERS SOLD AT TWO PRICES ANDSOON READ OF THAT GREAT ENTHUSIASM AMOUNG THE MEN.
APRIL 14TH - THIS IS THE DAY 4 YEARS AGO THAT THE STARS AND STRIPES WERETAKEN FROM FORT SUMPTER AND TODAY IT WAS REPLACED. WE HAD A GENERALREVIEW AND SOME SPEECHES. *
APRIL 15TH - LAST NIGHT 10 1/2 O'CLOCK THE CHIEF MAGISTRATE OF THE UNITEDSTATES WAS SHOT AND SEVERAL OTHER OUTRAGES THAT COULD NOT HAVE HAD THEIRORIGIN ANY PLACE THIS SIDE OF HELL. IT SEEMS STRANGE THAT ON NIGHT SOSWEET SUCH A FULL MOON COULD RISE. THERE WAS A PICKET LINE THROWN OUT ALLALONG THE RIVER.
APRIL 18TH - YESTERDAY WE WERE PATROLLING ALONG THE RIVER OVER THE ROCKSAND THIS MORNING I FELT PRETTY OLD. MOBILE HAS SURRENDERED AND MOSBE SENTIN TO BE PERMITTED TO SURRENDER AS LEE DID. THE ASSASSIN OF THE PRESIDENTSTILL AT LARGE.
APRIL 27TH, 1865 - I WAS UP TODAY TO SEE THE 19TH CORPS (OR PART OF IT).IT IS LAYING NEAR TIMBE TOWN. I SAW SOME OF MY ACQUAINTANCES BUT NOT ALL.YESTERDAY E'S HOST WAS HERE TO SEE US.
APRIL 28TH - I SAW A FLOCK OF SWALLOWS TODAY FOR THE FIRST.
APRIL 30TH - WE LEFT THE QUARTERS THIS MORNING AT 7 A.M. FOR TO BEMUSTERED. WE FIRST HAD REVIEW THEN INSPECTION AND THEN WE WERE MUSTEREDAND GOT TO THE QUARTERS ABOUT 2 OCLOCK.
MAY 1ST - ABOUT THIS TIME THE WHIPPOORILLS COMMENCED HOLLERING.
MAY 23RD - THIS IS THE DAY THAT THE GRAND REVIEW OF THE ARMY COMMENCED.THERE WAS 70 OR 80 THOUSAND PASSED THROUGH TODAY.
MAY 24TH - I WAS DOWN TO SEE THE REMAINDER OF THE PROCESSION PASSTHROUGH. THERE WAS 4 CO. THAT PASSED THROUGH. FIRST CAME THE 15TH THENTHE 17TH NEXT THE 20TH AND THEN THE 14TH. SOME OF THE FLAGS HAD NOTHINGLEFT BUT THE STAFF AND A FEW SHORT RAGS WHICH WERE NEERLY ALL CHEEREDHEARTILY. THE WESTERN TROOPS NEARLY ALL WORE HATS AND LOOKED LARGE ANDSTOUT. THERE WAS ONE SAP HEADED CITIZEN THERE WITH SOME SOFT LOOKINGGIRLS THAT KEPT UP SUCH A CLATTERING THAT IT MADE ME MAD. HE WAS UP WHEREI COULD NOT GET AT HIM OR I WOULD HAVE KNOCKED HIM SO STIFF THAT HECOULDN'T HAVE CLAPPED HIS HANDS FOR A WHILE I'LL BET.
JUNE 13TH - THIS EVENING WE WERE MUSTERED OUT OF THE U.S. SERVICE AND AGOOD BIT OF ______ _____ RUMORS AFLOAT. (EAST HOUSE OR COST OR COAT HOUSE) 
Reno, Joseph Iddings (I380)
 
10 (continued from Molly Compton's notes)...
He had wondered how she would act when they would meet again. She was tenwhen he left; when they met the next time in the Guest house, she wasfourteen, and the real belle of Bonhamtown. She never told me she waspretty, but she was. Mrs. Cornelia Dunham, who was an associate, and Isuspect an ambitious rival, informed me in after years that Molly wasbeautiful at fourteen and for many years thereafter. She was charming atsixty. Lewis knew she was fair to look upon and found her as faithful asshe was fair. He was very much ashamed of it, and could not account forit, but it was impossible to refrain from indulging in a flood of tearswhen they met; and she cried too. He could say bu one word. and that was,PEACE. That one short word spoke volumes about the stormy past, thedelicious present, and the time to come. Lewis and Molly had been warmfriends at school, at picnics and other places before the war, and nowthey were ardent lovers.
In 1794, Lewis went as a New Jersey militiaman to help quell the "WhiskeyRiot" at Pittsburg. The expedition was successful and he soon returned,glad as ever to see Bonhamtown and Molly. He and Molly Compton weremarried in the Thomas Guest house, in Bonhamtown, January 25th, 1797. Thegallant fourteen-year old lad became my grandfather, and Molly Comptonwas finally my excellent grandmother.
Dr. D.H. Thickstun has hung up in a safe place in his office inPlainfield, the musket which was surrendered by the Scotch Sergeant tohis brave great-grandfather.
These reminiscences, and many more "of ye olden times," I have heardsubstantially, as here stated, from the lips of my grandmother, the once"Pretty Molly Compton." 
Thickstun, Lewis William (I1011)
 
11 (Earliest spelling, Devoir), settled on the north side of the MonongahelaRiver (opposite of the present Monongahela) about 1770. The DAR recordsof his son Samuel indicates that they were living in France in 1751.James died before he could apply for a Virginia certificate. He ran aferry until his death in 1779, when Joseph Parkinson took over. Devore, James (I994)
 
12 (French)
1900 census of son william

abt 1830 canada
1870 census

abt 1830 canada
1860 census

abt 1830 canada
1880 census

abt 1830 conn
1850 census 
Marilla (I11882)
 
13 (Medical):Alzheimer's Jensen, Peter William (I2829)
 
14 (Medical):Exact year of death unkown at this time (09/12/05) Johnson, Nellie M. (I15)
 
15 (Medical):Heart disease Reno, John Paul Rev. (I334)
 
16 (Medical):Heart disease Reno, Lavina Fern (I375)
 
17 (Medical):Heart disease, High blood pressure, Cancer, Diabetes Reno, Carrie Thickstun (I303)
 
18 (Medical):Mom's twin sister who died very young. Lohman, Vera (I17)
 
19 (Medical):Stroke Satterlee, Fayette (I2874)
 
20 (Medical):Stroke Martin, Merle (I3837)
 
21 (Medical):This is my Dad's brother who mover to California and broke off contact with his family. Dugan, Donald (I25)
 
22 (Research):
Database: U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 November 20, 2005 3:00 AM

Name: Jesse J Dugan
Birth Year: 1920
Race: White, citizen
Nativity State or Country: New York
State: New York
County or City: Columbia

Enlistment Date: 13 Dec 1941
Enlistment State: New York
Enlistment City: Albany
Branch: Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code: Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Grade: Private
Grade Code: Private
Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component: Army of the United States - includes the following: Voluntary enlistments effective December 8, 1941 and thereafter; One year enlistments of National Guardsman whose State enlistment expires while in the Federal Service; Officers appointed in the Army of
Source: Civil Life

Education: Grammar school
Marital Status: Single, without dependents
Height: 65
Weight: 132
 
Dugan, Jesse J. (Dugie) Jr. (I24)
 
23 3rd generation Irish immigrant - his grandfather, John Dugan, immigrated from Ireland in 1861. Place of origination is currently unknown. Dugan, Michael William Sr. (I14)
 
24 A CAPTAIN IN CROMWELLS ARMY (according to legend). CAME TO AMERICA ABOUT1683 AFTER GENERAL CROMWELL'S DEATH. NAME OF THICHSTUN CHANGED TOTHICKSTUN AFTER ARRIVAL IN AMERICA? Thickstun, Thomas (I2123)
 
25 A MAN OF CONSIDERABLE NOTE AMONG THE PROPRIETORS, AND PERHAPS THE BESTCLERK IN COMPANY. HE MAY HAVE BEEN OF THE SAME FAMILY AS EDWARD BIRCHERWHO ARRIVED IN PLYMOUTH IN 1623. THE EARLIEST RECORDS ARE SUPPOSED TO BEIN HIS HAND-WRITING. WAS FIRST SCHOOL-MASTER IN NORWICH. Birchard, John (I664)
 
26 A MEMBER OF GOV. CATER'S HOUSEHOLD AS HER PARENTS DIED SOON AFTERREACHING AMERICA. THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN A RELATIVE OF THE GOV. Tilley, Elizabeth (I750)
 
27 A newspaper article follows to which Carrie St.John appended ahand-written note: "Born: Lois Ann June 27, 1806 Died: LouisianaJuly 22, 1879
73 yrs. & 46 days". The article -
Louisiana St. John's Will
-----------------------------
Remembering her Poor Tenants and her Nurse-Provisions for her Burial.
The last testament of Miss Louisiana St.John, the eccentricmillionaire, who occupied very humble quarters in Elizabeth street at thetime of her death in this city in July last is to be admitted to probateon the 7th of October next. The property to be divided is enormous andis mainly in real estate in New York city and Yonkers, and a large tractof land in East St.Louis, all estimated to be worth several millions.The bulk of the property is to be divided among six nieces and onenephew, who live in Canajoharie, and a nephew who lives in Michigan.First the testatrix gives $1,000 cash each to such of her executors asqualify. These are Thomas J. McKee of 338 Broome street, the lawyer whodrew her will, Jos. L. Schofield, H. A. Sackett, one of her cousins, andStephen Cutter, President of the Prison Association. To her housekeeper,Mrs. Sophia Clarke of Elizabeth street, she leaves her furniture, trunks,jewelry, and about all her personal property, except her gold watch andspectacles, which she leaves to her neice Sarah. The executors aredirected to buy a house for $8,000, which Mrs. Clarke may use as long asshe lives, the house to go to her niece, Olive, at Mrs. Clarke's death.
To Harriet L. Calkins, daughter of her cousin, the testatrix leaves$1,000; to Edwin Augell, an uncle, $500; to the Ames Cemetery, inMontgomery County, where she is buried, she leaves $10,000, which thetrustees are directed to invest, the income to be spent in improving andbeautifying the cemetery and in looking after her plot and keeping it inproper repair. She gives explicit directions about her funeral and thepreparation of her grave. Her executors are directed to have her bodyenclosed in a galvanized iron coffin, and then deposited in the grave shehad prepared with cemented foundations in her lifetime. Her father,mother, and uncle are buried there, and she directs her executors to putaround the burial plot a coping stone from eight to ten inches,surmounting a stone wall to enclose the plot. A new marble monumentseven feet square, and eight or ten feet high, must be erected in thecentre of the plot. On the face of the monument next the road must bethe name, "St.John," and on the other side the names of her relatives. Adrain is to be made about two feet beneath the surface, from thesouthwest corner of the lot to the road, and the entrance gate is to beat the northwest corner.
To her cousin, Isaac G. Sackett, the testatrix leaves $1,000. ToMrs. Drake, a former tenant, $200. To Mrs. McCarthy, a former tenant,$200. These last two sums she directs to be paid to Mrs. Clarke,evidently with the view of having care taken that the money should bejudiciously expended by Mrs. Clarke for the benefit of her poor tenants.To Maria D. Osborn, wife of a poor tenant in St.Louis, she leaves $300.To Thomas Miller of St.Louis, another tenant, $300. To Jospeh Purcell, atenant, $300. To a nurse, A.C. Colton, who attended her, $100. ToHannah St.John Cannon, $100. To her grand-nephew, T.E. Walrath, $500,and an interest in a lease of part of her St.Louis property; and to hisbrother, Charles a similar sum. To P.S. Cone, her agent at St.Louis,$1,000.
To the Methodist Episcopal Church in Railroad avenue, St.Louis, thetestatrix leaves a strip of ground adjoining the church, on conditionthat they get out of debt within five years.
The executors are directed to turn all the real estate into money,and divide it among the heirs within five years.
Just previous to her death Miss St.John was somewhat fickle in hernotions of disposing of her property. At one time she contemplatedestablishing a number of free lodging houses and hospitals in this city.At another she was on the verge of giving $10,000 for the publication ofthe writings of a reformer whose notions pleased her temporarily. Sheeven thought of giving $10,000 to one man whose full name she did notknow. Her predominant wish was to have no fuss or contest over herproperty, and it was with that in view that she finally consented to givethe bulk of it to her heirs-at-law.
Although living in very humble quarters in Elizabeth street, MissSt.John had sometimes as much as $50,000 on deposit in the Chemical Bank,and sometimes as much as $30,000 in her pockets. Yet she was so shabbilydressed that at one time she was denied a lease by an agent of CoudertBrothers, because it was feared that she could not pay the rent. Shesoon settled their doubts by asking;
How much will you take off if I pay a year's rent in advance?"
The agent reduced his price several hundred dollars, and she drewthe money from her pocket. When the agent presented her with the leaseto sign, she said she had one that she had prepared herself. The CoudertBrothers were so taken with the business-like document that it wassuggested that she should be employed to draw up leases for the firm.She liked business and litigation. Indeed, that was her chiefdiversion. She bought disputed titles of property and fought them out.She attended personally to the searching of deeds and payment of taxesand was well known in all the public offices. She paid much personalattention to her property in East St.Louis, and was at the time of herdeath in hot litigation with a railroad company that she was trying toeject from some of her lands. She was so habitually penurious that shegave strict orders that no more that twenty cents should be paid for awatermelon that she wanted. She weighed about 300 pounds. 
Stjohn, Louisana (I2069)
 
28 abt 1823 new york
1860 census

abt 1824 new york
1870 census 
Van Alstyne, Linus (I11881)
 
29 abt 1851 michigan
1900 census

abt 1851 michigan
1920 census

abt 1851 michigan
1860 census

abt 1851 michigan
1870 census 
Van Alstyne, William L (I11880)
 
30 abt 1855 mich
1860 census

abt 1854 mich
1870 census 
Van Alstyne, Charles (I11890)
 
31 According to 1900 Federal Census, lived in Chatham with her Aunt Henrietta and Uncle George (Loman). Van Alstyne, Eva (I6005)
 
32 AFTER 10 YEARS AT GE, MOVED TO CARLISLE, NY, WHERE HE AND HILDA PURCHASEDAN OLD COLONIAL HOTEL - WHICH WAS BUILT IN 1803. THEY REMODELED IT ANDUSING THE FORMER STAGE COACH BARNS AS A GARAGE, MADE THEIR LIVING FROMTOURISTS AND TOW CAR/ AUTO REPAIR BUSINESS. DIVORCED HILDA 1928. MARRIEDTO MARY FOR 50 YEARS. WAS A SGT IN NATIONAL GUARD. ALSO A MEMBER OFMASONIC LODGE IN SCHENECTADY, NY. WAS AN HONEST MAN AND VERY OUTSPOKENIF SOMEONE TRIED TO "DUPE" HIM OR IMPOSE THEIR OPINION ON HIM. Jensen, Joubert William (Bill) (I2832)
 
33 AFTER DEATH OF PARENTS, ALLEN AND SISTER WERE PLACED IN WHITE'SINSTITUTE, WABASH, IN. ADOPTED LATER BY PEOPLE NAMED ISGRIGG. WAS KILLEDIN WW1. Bray, Allen (I3603)
 
34 AFTER DEATH OF PARENTS, BERTHA AND BROTHER ALLEN PLACED IN WHITE'SINSTITUTE, WABASH, IN. SISTER, HAZEL, MARRIED AND TOOK BERTHA INTO HERHOME WHEN BERTHA WAS 13. Bray, Bertha (I3598)
 
35 Alice was killed in a car accident in Leadville, CO. (source: herneice, Trella Zongker Fyler, 1999)

Middle name Lacreta? 
Wohlgehagen, Alice Lacreta (I9567)
 
36 ALSO WORKED 43 YEARS FOR GENERAL ELECTRIC, SCHENECTADY, NY. RESPONSIBLEFOR ERECTION OF FIRST GE TOWERS USED IN RADIO RECEPTION FOR W.G.Y.BURIED IN PARK CEMETERY, SCOTIA, NY Jensen, Peter William (I2829)
 
37 AN EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED CHILD MUSICALLY. HE WAS THE ONLY SOLOIST(VIOLIN) AT A MEETING OF THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION TO WHICH HISTEACHER HAD HIM FLOWN. A CHARMING, WINSOME, WILLING CHILD WHO MET WITH ABICYCLE-TRUCK CONFRONTATION. HIS FUNERAL IN PORTLAND, TN WAS ATTENDED BY700 PEOPLE. Mazanec, David James (I242)
 
38 ANCESTORS MIGRATED FROM ENGLAND IN THE 1700'S TO NEW ENGLAND STATES.ORIGINALLY THE FAMILY NAME WAS LEE BUT BECAUSE OF THEIR AFFILIATION WITHTHE SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH WERE LABELED THE "SATURDAY LEES" WHICHEVENTUALLY WAS SHORTENED TO SATERLEE. THEY HAVE AN IMPECCABLE REPUTATIONFOR HONESTY, FAITH IN THEIR RELIGION, BUT NOT BIGOTED, AND INDUSTRY.THEIR LIFE WORK WAS MOSTLY AS FARMERS, ALTHOUGH SEVERAL WERE TEACHERS. Satterlee, Nelson (I2870)
 
39 Arizona Republic, Phoenix, AZ:
Cora A. Reno, 82, of Scottsdale, a professor at Wheaton and Westmontcolleges and Viola University, died Dec. 24, 1994. She was born inEdinboro, Pa. Survivors include her 17 nieces and nephews. Serviceswill be held in Pennsylvania. Contributions: Billy Graham EvangelisticAssociation, P.O. Box 779, Minneapolis, Minn. 55440. Green Acres Mortuary. 
Reno, Cora Alice (I333)
 
40 ARRIVED IN PHILADELPHIA, PA FROM ENGLAND, 1683.
MARRIED BY JUSTICE OF THE PEACE IN WOODBRIDGE, PROVINCE OF NEW JERSEY.
BURIED IN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHYARD, WOODBRIDGE, NJ 
Freeman, Henry Sr. (I1116)
 
41 ASSISTED IN CAPACITY OF DEPUTY TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF RHODE ISLANDOCTOBER 1776, MAY 1777. APPOINTED TO PROCURE BLANKETS FROM THE TOWN OFCOVENTRY, MAY 1777. FROM RECORDS OF THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND PAGES219-254.
1776-1779 VITAL RECORDS OF RHODE ISLAND GENEOLOGY. 
Greene, Hon. John (I840)
 
42 ASSISTED IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE DURING THE WAR OFTHE REVOLUTION, AS FOLLOWS:
IN THE PENNSYLVANIA ARCHIVES, SERIES V., VOL V, PAGES 661 AND 854, EZRA(IZRA) HOOPS (HOOPES) IS REFERRED TO AS AN ASSOCIATOR AND MILITIAMAN INTHE WEST TOWN COMPANY FOR THE YEAR 1780, AND IN THE GOSHEN MUSTER ROLLFOR THE LATTER PART OF 1782.
1902-1903 THE BULLETINS OF THE CHESTER COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY,
1902-1903, UNDER THE "RECORDS OF GOSHEN MONTHLY MEETING", PAGE 20, THEREIS TH FOLLOWING NOTE:
"EZRA HOOPES MADE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 9-10-1779 FOR TAKING THE TEST ORAFFIRMATION OF ALLEGIANCE; ACCEPTED." 
Hoopes, Ezra (I993)
 
43 AT 16, MOVED TO UNIONTOWN AND THERE SPENT 5 YEARS, LEARNING THE TRADE OFA HATTER. AT 21, HE CAME TO WOODBRIDGE, AND BEGAN FARMING WITH HISFATHER. BURIED IN METUCHEN, NJ. Thornal, Manning (I1067)
 
44 AT AGE 16 SHE WAS ADVISED TO LEAD A SEDENTARY EXISTENCE BECAUSE OF AHEART CONDITION. HER FATHER HIRED A MAN WHO FOR YEARS FOLLOWED HEREVERYWHERE SHE WENT, CARRYING HER UP STEPS OR INCLINES. UNDER THESECONDITIONS SHE STUDIED AT THE ROCHESTER (LATER EASTMAN) CONSERVATORY OFMUSIC AND AT THE NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY, RETURNING HOME TO HEAD THEPIANO DEPT AT EDINBORO NORMAL SCHOOL.
HER SON RELATES: "WHEN GRANDFATHER RENO ( A BAPTIST) LEARNED THAT MYFATHER HAD DECIDED TO BECOME A METHODIST MINISTER, HE FORBID HIM TO SETFOOT ON THE PLACE. HOWEVER, WHEN THEY PLANNED TO GET MARRIED,GRANDMOTHER PUT HER FOOT DOWN, HER DAUGHTER WOULD BE MARRIED IN HER OWNHOME AS WAS AT THAT TIME THE CUSTOM, AND UNCLE LOREN CAME UP FROM BRAZILTO MARRY THEM. THERE WERE 80 GUESTS AT THE WEDDING, BUT GRANDFATHER RENOWAS NOT AMONG THEM... HIS ATTITUDE CHANGED SUFFICIENTLY LATER TO CAUSEHIM TO APPOINT MY FATHER AS EXECUTER OF HIS ESTATE." 
Reno, Lavina Fern (I375)
 
45 Aunt Rettie (as she was called) died just 15 minutes before her 105thbirthday. She had been blind since sometime between her 80th and 90thyear, but kept her home in Jonesboro, AR. until she fell and broke a hipabout 5 years prior to her death. Devore, Arretta Daisy May (I3830)
 
46 Bought patent from Stephanus Vancortland. Van Vechten, Dirck Teunis (I9296)
 
47 Bov parish earlier called Bau (LKr. Flensburg), Schleswig-Holstein,Prussian, Germany. Wohlgehagen, Friedrich Thomas (I9560)
 
48 Burdge Funeral Home Record Book
Glenwood Springs
Copied by Donna L Drummond

J.C. Schwarz 'Jakie' began the Funeral home business inconjunction
with a store which carried ensudry items including: Toys, Furniture,
Crockery, Chinaware and Cut Glass, Baby Carriages, Invalid Chairs and
Sewing Machines to rent. The business was location on Grand Ave. in
downtown Glenwood Springs. Joseph Ira Burdge apprentices under the
direction of J. C. Schwarz. Probably about May of 1919, Mr. Schwarz
retired and J. I. Burdge became owner of the Funeral Home.

There are some books missing, including those containing the dates:
October 1939 through September 1949, and those after 1956 until Wayne
Burdge, son and heir of Joseph Ira Burdge, closed the mortuary.

My observations on the Burdge records: C. J. Crawford and Wm Pings
purchased caskets, etc. from Burdge for people in their areas.
Crawford, New Castle; Pings, Carbondale.

WHOLGEHAGEN, Anna. (b 6, p 62), Nov. 14, 1945. Residence, Mc Coy,
Colorado. Charged to John Watkins, McCoy, Colorado. Order given by
Mr. Watkins. Occupation, housewife. Born Sept. 9, 1868, aged 70
years, 2 months, 4 days. Funeral at Liberal, Kansas. Born, Grant
County, Indiana. Resided in this state 20 years. Death atPorter's
Hospital. Father, Randolph Wall, born North Carolina. Mother,
Elizabeth Okaver. Interred at Liberal, Kansas cemetery.

The following records were taken from the book, "Records of Reports Fromthe United States Land Office", County Assessor, Eagle, Colorado. Inorder to save time, I only copied the name of the purchaser, the year offinal proof, and the page number on which this information can be foundin the above titled book. You will notice in some cases that a personsname appears twice or that there are two different years listed with thesame name. I transcribed the information exactly as it appeared in thebook. Keep in mind that the following is only a small portion of thisbook. There is much more to transcribe, and I will do so as time permits
Eagle County Assessor's Office

P.O. Box 449

Eagle, Colorado

18631-0449.

Address your letter with - attention: Mapping Department.

Make sure to include the name of the person, the year of final proof, andthe page number. As you will see, the names are not in alphabeticalorder, nor are the years consecutive. The names of the purchasers werelisted according to the Township and Range upon which their land waslocated, so therefore the page number is most important.

What you will receive back from the Eagle County Assessor's Officehopefully will be a legal description of the land purchased. This shouldinclude Township, Range and Section numbers.

Please call to inquirer as to the cost or fee for such a search:970-328-8640, Fax 970-328-7370

Wohlgehagen, Anna 1934 p25
Wohlgehagen, Anna 1934 p57 
Wall, Anna R. (I9561)
 
49 BURIED AT GREE(N)DALE CEMETERY AT MEADVILLE, PA. Eastman, Eliza R. (I2100)
 
50 BURIED AT KINDERHOOK, NY. Harmense, Dirckje (Dorothy) (I747)
 

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